Obama Aborted the Recovery; Democrats Put Politics Ahead of American Families

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 12, 2010 | Go to article overview

Obama Aborted the Recovery; Democrats Put Politics Ahead of American Families


Byline: Ray Hartwell, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Obama administration has declared Recovery Summer, basically an ad campaign claiming wondrous job-creation results for $1 trillion or so in stimulus funding. Even more impressive, however, are the steps the administration has taken to destroy jobs at the very time it claims to be focused on their creation. And if we consider the sorts of jobs under attack by the administration, it's clear there is method to the mayhem.

Many thousands of existing jobs have been killed, and many thousands more that could be created are instead being aborted. In all instances, the ramifications go beyond the jobs themselves; the administration's actions will have broad consequences for our nation's economy and global standing.

The energy sector illustrates the point. Take nuclear power. We could reduce our dependence on energy produced by unfriendly countries and slash the carbon footprint of our power-production industry if we built 50 or so nuclear power plants. In the process, we could regain our past position as a global leader in the field while creating jobs for engineers, architects, those in construction trades and power-plant operators. This is not happening on President Obama's watch for many reasons, including the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain storage facility for spent nuclear fuel. The administration's Yucca Mountain cancellation was held unlawful earlier this summer by a panel of judges; we'll see whether the Obama regime will let respect for the law stand in the way of its plans.

Now, with the oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, Mr. Obama has moved smartly and unlawfully to kill thousands of additional jobs. His inaction in the face of an environmental catastrophe has left the economy of the Gulf Coast region reeling. And he has compounded the economic damage by imposing a drilling ban not only considered unnecessary and excessive by a panel of experts asked to review the decision, but also held to be arbitrary and capricious by a federal court. Job losses in the South are estimated to be as high as 200,000 or more.

The destructive drilling ban in the Gulf is complemented by similar measures in Alaska with respect to accessible oil and natural gas resources. In March, the administration canceled planned offshore lease sales, and in May, it announced the suspension of proposed exploratory drilling in the Arctic Ocean. More ominous are the administration's denial of a permit critical to a carefully crafted plan for oil development in the National Petroleum Reserve and what appear to be steps toward permanently blocking oil and gas production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

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