Psychology Masters Program Designed for Working Adults

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

Psychology Masters Program Designed for Working Adults


The Adler School of Professional Psychology is offering an option for social change-minded adults who want to pursue graduate school education -- without quitting their day jobs. Adler School now offers a new Master's in Counseling Psychology program which features the convenience of online classes guided by periodic campus-based classes that fit into most schedules.

The need has never been greater for well-trained psychology professionals who can bring a holistic, socially responsible approach to their work in community mental health, medicine, education, business and industry, and social services. Located in downtown Chicago, Adler School offers a number of degrees programs that can be earned through traditional on-site campus learning. But it also understands that, while many people really want to make the world better a better place, they may not have the time to pursue a degree during the day. Hence the new program, which offers convenience and individualized guidance.

Students in the program spend an average of a few hours a day on course work (many choose to shift most of the learning time to weekends), which ranges from participating in online discussions and reading textbooks and articles, to watching podcasts and completing written assignments, all from the convenience of the student's home.

Three times a year students will head to the vibrant Chicago Loop for four-day weekend immersion classes, or "residencies," which provide the opportunity to focus on specific topics, energized by the faculty and other students. …

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Psychology Masters Program Designed for Working Adults
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