Intentions to Use Virtual Worlds for Education

By Shen, Jia; Eder, Lauren B. | Journal of Information Systems Education, Summer 2009 | Go to article overview

Intentions to Use Virtual Worlds for Education


Shen, Jia, Eder, Lauren B., Journal of Information Systems Education


1. INTRODUCTION

The social networking capabilities of Web 2.0 have facilitated the use of the Internet and the Web much more as a collaborative platform than it was just a few years ago. In addition to information dissemination, advertising, and sales transactions, the Web is rapidly becoming popular as a place to conduct meetings, teach or take a class, interact virtually with others, or just socialize online.

Three-dimensional (3-D) social networking environments, or Internet-based virtual worlds, have been emerging rapidly since 2003. A virtual world is a computer-based simulated environment created with two- and three-dimensional graphical representations of a physical space. People interact with one another via avatars, which are graphical, 2- or 3-D representations of a user. The virtual world environment is an immersive, virtual reality space. The most well known Internet-based virtual world today is Linden Labs' Second Life (2009), a 3-D virtual world where users can socialize using voice and text chat. Virtual worlds are attracting attention in industry as well as academia for their potential to enhance online education and societal communities (Baxter, 2008; Cross, O'Driscoll, and Trondsen, 2007; Gartner, 2007; Lohr 2008; Ringo, 2007; Sarvary, 2008).

This study examines college students' intentions to accept and use virtual worlds as a learning platform. The focus on current college students is very relevant as evidence suggests that virtual worlds are becoming more prevalent in business, potentially affecting this population when it graduates and enters the workforce.

1.1 Background

Many companies, most notably IBM, are already investing strategically in the three-dimensional (3-D) Internet technologies that enable virtual worlds for business and for education (Lohr 2008; Ringo, 2007; Sarvary, 2008). Gartner, Inc., a leading information technology research and advisory company, presented its forecast for the future value of virtual worlds at its 2007 conference, stating that by the end of 2011, 80 percent of active Internet users and Fortune 500 enterprises will be participating in some form of virtual world (Gartner, 2007). They project that the community-related and collaborative aspects of virtual worlds will be of most value to corporate Internet users, while transaction-based, commercial activities will be of less importance. While they propose that the collaborative and community aspects of virtual worlds will be significant, they also caution companies to invest carefully, as the technology is young, and will continue to develop and mature.

1.2 Existing Research

There is a growing body of academic literature that explores the use of virtual worlds and avatars in business (e.g., Kock, 2008; Arakji and Lang, 2008). V-commerce, or Virtual Commerce, describes the integrative use of the 3-D Internet and virtual worlds to market products and services. Arakji and Lang (2008) developed a framework for organizations to measure the potential business costs and benefits associated with having a virtual presence in a virtual world. Barnes (2007) has recently developed a research agenda to examine the effectiveness of advertising towards intent to purchase. With more than 100 virtual worlds currently in existence online, new 3-D Internet environment models are emerging as opportunities to explore new integrative marketing channels. Barnes' research is among the first to empirically test the potential for avatars and virtual objects to influence trust and the intention to make purchases online in a 3-D virtual world.

Similar to how v-commerce models extend from e-commerce, v-learning can be viewed as an extension of e-learning (Baxter, 2008; Cross, O'Driscoll, and Trondsen, 2007). Cross, O'Driscoll, and Trondsen (2007) propose ways in which the capabilities of virtual worlds may be used to enhance existing learning models. Besides the well known value of the Internet for electronic collaboration and anytime/anywhere learner and teacher participation, virtual worlds provide the new element of an augmented reality. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Intentions to Use Virtual Worlds for Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.