Evaluating Work Performance and Support Needs in Supported Employment Training Programs: Correspondence between Teachers' Ratings and Students' Self Ratings?

By Brady, Michael P.; Frain, Michael et al. | The Journal of Rehabilitation, July-September 2010 | Go to article overview

Evaluating Work Performance and Support Needs in Supported Employment Training Programs: Correspondence between Teachers' Ratings and Students' Self Ratings?


Brady, Michael P., Frain, Michael, Duffy, Mary Lou, Bucholz, Jessica, The Journal of Rehabilitation


Although supported or competitive community employment has become a near universal expectation for public education, it continues to be an elusive goal for many individuals with disabilities (Brady & Rosenberg, 2002a; Rogan, Callahan, Griffin, & Hammis, 2007). After completing years of training and preparation, many students with disabilities exit school programs only to become unemployed or under-employed as adults, or are only able to gain access to sheltered employment or "work experience" programs (Hurlbutt & Chalmers, 2004; Mank, Cioffi, & Yovanoff, 1998; McDermott, Martin, & Butkus, 1999; Murphy, Rogan, Handley, Kincaid, & Royce-Davis, 2002).

For community employment to become a reliable post-school outcome, many individuals with disabilities require explicit, meaningful employment and transition planning. Employment preparation must target improvement of work performance in future employees, as well as the design and delivery of work supports (Brady & Rosenberg, 2002a; Rogan, Banks, & Howard, 2000. In addition, employment assessment systems need to target these two separate, but related dimensions. Where most employment evaluations certainly assess employees' work performance, few assess employees' performance given the types and levels of support provided (Brady, Rosenberg, & Frain, 2008).

In addition to including these two employment dimensions (performance and support needs), transition and employment evaluations also need to consider the data sources for the assessments. In school programs, external sources of data include the perceptions of teachers and job coaches; the perceptions of students themselves are another data source. In supported community employment, data sources include the perceptions of work supervisors and the employees. Data from the external sources (teachers, job coaches, work supervisors) are frequently used to make employment decisions about hiring, promotions, raises, and retention (Hamilton & Shumate, 2005). In contrast, many job planning and placement decisions gain validity only when students or adult employees themselves provide a self-determined voice (Brady et al., 2008; Wehman, 2006). For example, interventions such as self-monitoring and covert coaching promote job skills, placement selections, or changes in support and are highly dependent on the perceptions and willingness to participate of the people targeted for these interventions (Martin et al., 2003; Menchetti & Garcia, 2003; Olney & Salomone, 1992; Rogan et al., 2000).

To provide relevant and successful employment and transition plans for individuals with disabilities, assessments should include four dimensions. The first dimension includes students' and adult employees' work productivity (i.e., whether or not these individuals' productivity matches the productivity of others without disabilities). In practice, this dimension typically is assessed by reviewing employer and supervisor evaluations (Hamilton & Shumate, 2005. The second dimension includes assessments for supported employment that incorporate input on the type and level of support needed to establish any particular level of performance (Rogan et al., 2000). The third dimension of an employment assessment includes the teacher's or supervisor's perception of the person's performance and support needs supervisors' perceptions are critical to the day-to-day operation of the enterprise. Finally, the fourth dimension of an employment assessment that promotes learning and performance must include the individual's self-determined perspectives of one's own performance and support needs (Agran & Hughes, 2008; Brady et al., 2008).

Employment assessments that incorporate these four dimensions provide valuable data for transition and employment plans because decisions are made on potential job roles, work placements, performance interventions, and models of employment support. Data collected on these dimensions could reveal, for example, that a student's work performance on an assembly task is not sufficient to enter most community employment settings, but that restructuring a complex job into a series of simple tasks would improve that performance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Evaluating Work Performance and Support Needs in Supported Employment Training Programs: Correspondence between Teachers' Ratings and Students' Self Ratings?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.