E-Sources on Women & Gender

By Lehman, JoAnne | Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

E-Sources on Women & Gender


Lehman, JoAnne, Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources


Our website (http://womenst.library.wisc.edu/) includes recent editions of this column and links to complete back issues of Feminist Collections, plus many bibliographies, a database of women-focused videos, and links to hundreds of other websites by topic.

Information about electronic journals and magazines, particularly those with numbered or dated issues posted on a regular schedule, can be found in our "Periodical Notes" column.

BLOGS

What could be better, in the world of feminist blogging, than a global feminist blog aggregator? FEMINIST BLOGS: INDEPENDENT ALTERNATIVES TO THE MALESTREAM MEDIA at http://feministblogs.org/ "collects articles from many smaller community hubs within the Feminist Blogs network." Five hubs are represented, one of which ("Feminist Blogs in English") includes about a hundred different blogs! Check it out.

GIRL WITH PEN (http://girlwpen.com/) "publicly and passionately dispels modern myths concerning gender, encouraging other feminist scholars, writers, and thinkers to do the same." This is quite the sophisticated blogging venture, boasting a feminist-star-studded lineup of fourteen editors--Deborah Siegel, Virginia Rutter, Shira Tarrant, Veronica Arreola, Allison Kimmich, Courtney Martin, Adina Nack, Heather Hewett, Elline Lipkin, Leslie Heywood, Allison McCarthy, Alison Piepmeier, Lori Rotskoff, and Natalie Wilson--who post regularly here on different topics. Try matching the names above to the titles of the columns they write: "The Intersectional Feminist"; "Bedside Manners"; "Girl Talk"; "The Man Files"; "Mama w/Pen"; "Nice Work"; "Science Grrl"; "Generation Next"; "Body Language"; "Off the Shelf"; "Global Mama"; "Pop Goes Feminism"; "Beyond Pink and Blue"; "The Xena Files."

BOOKS, REPORTS, & OTHER PUBLICATIONS

The 2010 AMELIA BLOOMER LIST of "feminist books for young readers"--recommended by the FEMINIST TASK FORCE of the American Library Association's Social Responsibility Round Table--is in PDF here: http://libr.org/ftf/Amelia%20Bloomer2010%20fuial.pdf. (I want the picture book about Louise, the adventurous chicken!) Lists from the previous eight years are also downloadable: http://libr.org/ftf/bloomer.html.

"In all European countries and beyond, women are having difficulties getting ahead in research careers," say the writers of THE GENDER CHALLENGE IN RESEARCH FUNDING: ASSESSING THE EUROPEAN NATIONAL SCENES in the Executive Summary of this report, which "analyses the gender dynamics among applicants, recipients and gatekeepers of research funding, in funding processes, instruments and criteria, and the role of key funding organisations in promoting gender equality in research." Published by the Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2009. 136p. ISBN 978-9279105999; http://ec.europa.eu/research/science-society/document_library/pdf_06/the-gender-challenge-in-research-funding-report_en.pdf

"Disasters don't discriminate, but people do. Existing socio-economic conditions mean that disasters can lead to different outcomes even for demo graphically similar communities--but inevitably the most vulnerable groups suffer more than others. Research reveals that disasters reinforce, perpetuate and increase gender inequality, making bad situations worse for women." Thus begins MAKING DISASTER RISK REDUCTION GENDER SENSITIVE: POLICY AND PRACTICAL GUIDELINES, a 2009 publication from the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. Download the 163-page guide: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/9922_MakingDisasterRiskReductionGenderSe.

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