South Bend's High-Tech Research Initiative Brings Economic Growth to City

By Jones, Cherie Duvall | Nation's Cities Weekly, July 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

South Bend's High-Tech Research Initiative Brings Economic Growth to City


Jones, Cherie Duvall, Nation's Cities Weekly


Once a rust-belt community, South Bend, Ind., has developed an enterprising strategy to connect partners, investments and infrastructure, helping the city become a Midwestern hub of hightech research and economic growth.

A number of initiatives make up the playbook of South Bend's technological transformation, starting two years ago when the Semiconductor Research Corporation's Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI) selected the University of Notre Dame as the fourth of its national research centers.

A strong partner of the city, the South Bend-area university and its technical work in nanotechnology was attractive to NRI, whose goal is to advance research that will be the basis for the next generation of computer chips. Recognizing the importance of this Midwest Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery (MIND), the city committed $50 million to support efforts to commercialize its resulting work.

As a result of such efforts, last year, MIND produced new prototypes related to computing architecture and energy efficiency. According to South Bend Mayor Stephen Luecke, technological innovation such as this can lead to new, ground-breaking industries.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"Notre Dame has made a major commitment to research and commercialization of research at the university, which we think bowls well for the greater South Bend area," said Luecke. "In the long run, we really expect to transform South Bend's economy, we expect to see new jobs, new investment in our community, good high paying, high-tech jobs that will help us to move forward to really create some growth of wealth into the community."

The development of MIND has already guided the city in moving forward. It has helped stimulate the growth of a dual-site, state-certified technology park.

Located on the northeast side of South Bend, Innovation Park at Notre Dame was designed to facilitate commercialization for ventures at various stages of development. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

South Bend's High-Tech Research Initiative Brings Economic Growth to City
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.