End of Life Care: Everyone's Business

By Pearson, Debbie | British Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2010 | Go to article overview

End of Life Care: Everyone's Business


Pearson, Debbie, British Journal of Occupational Therapy


In 1789, the American writer, statesman and scientist Benjamin Franklin wrote: 'In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.' As universal and certain as death is, the majority of us prefer to ignore it, and health and social care practitioners can feel ill prepared to support people at the end stages of life.

My colleagues were bemused at my choice to work exclusively in palliative care: 'How can you do it, all the time?' In my experience as an occupational therapy lecturer, death, as a discrete subject, is still mysteriously absent from the curriculum (as it was during my education and training 25 years ago), and practice educators have refused to offer students placements on the basis that their work is 'too specialised'. Students can be fearful of practice placement in palliative care settings and may struggle to cope with the unexpected death of clients in other contexts. In a society that largely ignores death, this is understandable. However, are we missing out on an important opportunity to develop skills that enable occupational therapists to work effectively with people to support their occupational needs at the end stage of their lives?

As advances in the medical management of serious illness extend life expectancy, 'terminal diagnoses' are now referred to as 'long-term conditions' and occupational therapists will encounter people who live with a life-limiting illness. This provides an ideal opportunity for occupational therapists to support people to fulfil their priorities for living, while dying, and to enable participation in occupations that are important to them.

The recent publication End of Life Care--a Framework of National Occupational Standards (Skills for Health 2010) aims to develop the workforce to work more effectively with people who are dying. This framework, which builds upon the End of Life Care Strategy (Department of Health 2008), sets out core principles and competences. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

End of Life Care: Everyone's Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.