New Details Point to Sinking by Torpedo; South Korea Disputes U.S. Professors' Claims of 'Fabrication'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 30, 2010 | Go to article overview

New Details Point to Sinking by Torpedo; South Korea Disputes U.S. Professors' Claims of 'Fabrication'


Byline: Bill Gertz, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

An international investigative team released new details this week to bolster earlier conclusions that the South Korean warship Cheonan was sunk by a high-tech North Korean torpedo that exploded beneath the ship.

The South Korean government-led Joint Civilian-Military Investigative Group, or JIG, released the report in response to claims by two U.S. professors who charged that Seoul fabricated evidence linking North Korea to the sinking.

The .. Cheonan was split and sunk due to shockwave and bubble effect generated by a non-contact underwater explosion at a depth of 20 to 30 feet, the JIG stated In the group were 74 civilian and military analysts from South Korea, the United States, Australia, Britain and Sweden.

The JIG report disclosed that a shock wave from the torpedo explosion split the hull below the turbine engine room. The report included photos showing bottom plates bowed inward toward the ship, a sign of an external blast and not an internal explosion.

Survivors suffered broken bones, which the report said indicated a bubble jet effect generated by an underwater explosion.

Evidence of the North Korean torpedo included a Korean-language No. 1 inscribed on the propulsion section of the torpedo that was recovered.

A detailed analysis of the [No. 1] inscription was conducted using a spectroscope, the report said. This analysis found that the inscription is marked on anti-corrosive paint - which was applied on the iron part of the propulsion motor and has a color similar to stainless steel.

The report said the number was not destroyed because the explosion's heat did not damage that part of the torpedo.

The report also challenged the findings of the two professors, who claimed that their chemical analysis of aluminum residue suggested that an explosion was fabricated.

South Korean-born professors Seunghun Lee of the University of Virginia and J.J. Suh of Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies charged that the earlier JIG investigation failed to prove that an explosion occurred outside the ship or that it was caused by a torpedo made in North Korea. …

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