Navy Sees Quality Gains at Hospital; Outgoing Commander Is Given Credit for Marked Progress in Patient Satisfaction

By Gibbons, Timothy J. | The Florida Times Union, August 1, 2010 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Navy Sees Quality Gains at Hospital; Outgoing Commander Is Given Credit for Marked Progress in Patient Satisfaction


Gibbons, Timothy J., The Florida Times Union


Byline: TIMOTHY J. GIBBONS

When Navy Capt. Bruce Gillingham moves into his next job as fleet surgeon for the Pacific Fleet in a few weeks, a key part of his job will be building relationships with countries in the region.

He's had practice doing so during the two years he served as head of Jacksonville Naval Hospital, a tour he finished last month.

"There was never a time he was asked to do something that he said he was too busy to do it," said Jay Millson, executive director of the Duval County Medical Society.

Building on programs started by his predecessor, Capt. Raquel Bono, Gillingham got hospital personnel more involved in the local medical community and marked a rise in safety and patient satisfaction at the facility, which in recent years had been plagued with lawsuits stemming from medical mistakes made there.

"He helped the naval hospital move up a level in terms of quality and safety," Millson said. "That's what they needed."

When Gillingham took over in 2008, a Navy-wide quarterly patient survey showed an 88 percent satisfaction rate, compared with 92 percent in June. On a separate monthly survey of patients, satisfaction rates jumped from ratings in the 70s to 88 percent.

"He had a strong, sincere interest in attention to detail and transparency," said Yank Coble, director of the Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida.

Gillingham was one of 10 founding members of the Quality Collaborative of Northeast Florida, a regional organization dedicated to patient safety issues.

"Quality and safety are things that must be collaborated on," said Coble, who is also involved with the consortium.

Gillingham was also involved in local conferences on patient care, hosted a symposium on patient safety and introducing the Department of Defense patient-safety program to the hospital.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Navy Sees Quality Gains at Hospital; Outgoing Commander Is Given Credit for Marked Progress in Patient Satisfaction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?