Don't Fix Budget by Hurting Disabled

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 2, 2010 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Don't Fix Budget by Hurting Disabled


Don't fix budget by hurting disabled

To the editor: On July 26, many citizens rightfully celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and how it has transformed the lives of people with disabilities, especially in the workplace.

However, it's difficult to celebrate when our most vulnerable citizens continue to be presented by our state and its legislators as a liability, not an asset, as our state wrestles with financial solvency.

Illinois ranks among the last 10 states in every category linked to supporting people with disabilities, and dead last (51st, counting the District of Columbia) for community residential services.

Year after year, support for our most vulnerable citizens is jeopardized. Last summer, Gov. Quinn threatened 50 percent cutbacks to disability programs, which fortunately didn't happen.

Today, however, the budget ax threatens tens of thousands of innocent lives when it should cut fatty, wasteful and less productive state expenditures and focus on identifying new streams of revenue.

We know there is at least $94 million in community services (from the Department of Human Services) on the chopping block. Little City stands to lose more than $1.4 million for the hundreds of children and adults and their families we serve in Chicago's surrounding counties.

Yes, the state is in financial crisis. Yes, cutbacks need to be made. However, when this ongoing "crisis" affects an already underfunded group of Illinois' most vulnerable citizens, there is little to celebrate.

Twenty years after establishing such a significant national milestone, we should be celebrating significant progress. Instead, service agencies are looking at ways to do less with less or close their doors, thus turning back the clock on all the gains that have been made.

The ADA was a major step in promoting opportunity and fairness while preventing discrimination in the workplace. Progress has been made, but we still have a long way to go when it comes to providing these protections and promoting other quality of life aspects for people with disabilities.

I pray Illinois lawmakers will take their roles mindfully when they return to Springfield; a responsible budget does not have to exclude the people who need funding the most.

Shawn E. Jeffers

Executive Director

Little City Foundation

Palatine

Millar is leading District 15 into ruin

To the editor: If you remember when Dr. Lukich was hired, like I do, the board president was Mr. Millar.aMr. Millar and his minions ran on the platform that the district needs to save money and clean up their act. They voted for everything Dr. Lukich received in his contract.

Now, we the people are left holding the bag for paying his contract off.aEveryone that knows about contracts knows they are legal papers and must be followed to the letter of the law.

Mr. Millar and his minions were against the referendum that would have helped this district. They worked very hard so it wouldn't pass. District 211 got their referendum and they are in fine shape financially. No one is being riffed and class sizes are not getting bigger!a

Under his regime good experienced teachers and principals moved to other districts in the area.aThey saw what was coming in our future.

Monies coming from the state of Illinois and Cook County are very slow in arriving, and the board knows this.aOur district was top in the state and many families moved here because of it.aWe knew the taxes were going to be higher to get our children a good education.

This board, under Dr. Chapman, is working to get it back. Remember, a good high school system comes from what is taught in grade school. The basics and experiences must be taught first and that's what District 15 is all about, not just money, but our children.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Don't Fix Budget by Hurting Disabled
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.