Your Contribution Could Help Build Collective Memory of TV in Wales; A New Study Is Investigating the Influence Television Has Had on Family Life in Wales, Asking People to Share Their Memories for a Digital Archive. Gareth Evans Tunes In

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

Your Contribution Could Help Build Collective Memory of TV in Wales; A New Study Is Investigating the Influence Television Has Had on Family Life in Wales, Asking People to Share Their Memories for a Digital Archive. Gareth Evans Tunes In


Byline: Gareth Evans

IT BROUGHT us the Queen's Coronation, the golden age of Welsh rugby and harrowing images of the Aberfan disaster. For years families the length and breadth of Wales have sat down together to watch some of the defining moments in 20th century history.

Black-and-white sets were the focal point of packed living rooms and community life before television evolved into the technological staple we know today.

But 57 years after Queen Elizabeth II was crowned before an audience of 27 million, a new study will investigate the influence television has had on family life in Wales.

Aberystwyth University this week launched Media and Memory in Wales 1950-2000, at the National Eisteddfod in Ebbw Vale.

Led by Dr Iwan Morus and Dr Jamie Medhurst, researchers will record interviews with people in Wrexham, Caernarfon, Rhondda and Carmarthen about their memories of watching historic events on television and how they reflect their sense of belonging and identity. Working with project partners Culturenet Cymru, the interviews will form a bilingual digital archive which members of the public will be able to access online.

Visitors will be encouraged to add their own memories in the form of images, audio or video.

Dr Morus said: "It is a truism that family life during the second half of the 20th century revolved increasingly around the television set which formed a prominent feature - often the primary focus - of the living room.

"Our aim is to collect and archive people's memories relating to the age of television in Wales, from seeing television for the first time to watching these major TV events."

Selected events include the Coronation, which took place in Westminster Abbey on June 2, 1953, and the flooding of the Tryweryn Valley in 1965 to supply Liverpool with water.

The Aberfan disaster of 1966, which claimed 144 lives including those of 116 schoolchildren in the mining community, will live long in the memory for people of a certain age.

The Investiture the Prince of Wales on July 1, 1969, was a landmark for the whole country - as was the so-called golden age of Welsh rugby, when Gareth Edwards and company dominated the 1970s scene. …

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Your Contribution Could Help Build Collective Memory of TV in Wales; A New Study Is Investigating the Influence Television Has Had on Family Life in Wales, Asking People to Share Their Memories for a Digital Archive. Gareth Evans Tunes In
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