County Puts Funds at Risk

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), July 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

County Puts Funds at Risk


Byline: The Register-Guard

How much is the Lane County Board of Commissioners prepared to throw away because of its groundless fears about an upgrade to Coburg's freeway interchange? More than a quarter of a billion dollars? The interests of other local governments and the state of Oregon? Trust in the county's willingness to abide by its commitments? All of these are in danger because of the county board's dilatory treatment of a vital intergovernmental transportation planning document.

Federal law requires that local governments adopt an updated Metropolitan Transportation Improvement Program every four years. Central Lane County's adopting agency is the Metropolitan Policy Committee, representing county government, the Lane Transit District, the state Department of Transportation and the cities of Eugene, Springfield and Coburg. Only those projects included in an updated transportation program will be eligible for federal funds in the next four years.

This month the MPC was set to approve a transportation program that includes 74 projects costing $269 million, with $123 million provided by the federal government and $146 million coming from state and local sources. Lane County's representatives on the committee, Peter Sorenson and Rob Handy, had reservations about one project - a set of improvements west of Interstate 5 in Coburg. The commissioners are worried that the improvements would lead to sprawl, and might commit the county to supporting a second, more expensive, phase of the project. MPC actions require the support of all member jurisdictions, so Lane County's lack of concurrence meant the updated transportation program could not be approved.

The update must be in the hands of the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration before the federal fiscal year begins on Oct. 1. The actual deadline is about a month earlier, because Gov. Ted Kulongoski's office must collate the transportation programs prepared by various parts of the state before submitting them to the federal agencies. Indeed, the MPC is already behind schedule - the governor's office would like to have regional plans in hand by the end of this month, and that's not going to happen.

The county board ensured a further delay at its meeting Wednesday, when it asked for a report on how all other transportation and planning documents would need to be amended to make sure the county was under no obligation to support improvements to the Coburg interchange beyond those included in the transportation program. This would entail altering nine approved plans. Some of the changes would have to be approved by more than one jurisdiction, and some would require analysis and review.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

County Puts Funds at Risk
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.