Tatton Park Finds Gaskell's Own North and South

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 23, 2010 | Go to article overview

Tatton Park Finds Gaskell's Own North and South


Byline: Laura Davis

AN EXHIBITION charting the life of Victorian novelist Elizabeth Gaskell will take place in the heart of the setting of her most famous works. The show will take place at Tatton Park's Mansion in Knutford - the Cheshire town on which she based her fictional Cranford.

Curated by historian Joan Leach, Elizabeth Gaskell's Cheshire will explore the literary and personal connections between the author and the local area.

It is just one of a number of events taking place across Cheshire and Manchester to mark the bicentenary of her birth.

Gaskell once advised a young writer to be an "auditor and spectator of the scenes", a technique she used in her own work.

"The variety of influences was bountiful in nineteenth century Cheshire," says Lynn Podmore, Tatton's learning and visitor services manager. "She focused on characters and places in and around the town of Knutsford, as well as the local gentry in their stately homes, the mill workers in industrial Manchester and the beauty of the Cheshire landscape."

Gaskell's literary legacy lives on and interest in her work has increased significantly in recent years due to the BBC's award-winning adaptations of her novel Cranford.

Born in Chelsea in 1810, Gaskell moved to Knutsford - her "dear, adopted native town" in infancy after the death of her mother. …

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