U.S. Human Rights Report Hails Obama Practices; Report Cites Strides for Minorities, Gays

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

U.S. Human Rights Report Hails Obama Practices; Report Cites Strides for Minorities, Gays


Byline: Eli Lake, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A new State Department report on America's human rights record praises many of President Obama's domestic reforms in making the case to the world body for U.S. progress on human rights.

The 29-page report is the first to be submitted by the United States this week to the U.N. Human Rights Council and will be the basis of a human rights audit that U.S. representatives will take part in later this year.

The human rights audit, also known as the universal periodic review, is required of all U.N. member states. China, Iran and North Korea have already submitted their human rights records to the review.

The report - which addresses America's history of slavery, discrimination against women, ethnic minorities and gays - sounds in parts like political campaign literature.

For example, in a section about equality for people with disabilities the report states, President Obama further demonstrated the nation's commitment to continued vigilance and improvement by announcing new regulations that increase accessibility in a variety of contexts and commit the federal government to hiring more persons with disabilities.

The report touts Mr. Obama's new health care and finance reforms, signed into law earlier this year, but also lesser-known pieces of legislation, like the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009, which gives women the right to sue employers if they are paid less than men, as an example of the president's commitment to gender equality.

The review highlights the president's announced commitment to repealing the military's don't ask, don't tell policy banning open gays in the military; and also what the document calls the historic summit in November with nearly 400 Native American tribal leaders.

Mr. Obama reversed policy of the George W. Bush administration and instructed the State Department to participate in the reformed Human Rights Council that has to date devoted almost all of its time to criticizing Israel, while devoting little or no attention to human rights crises in places like Sudan, Iran, China or Saudi Arabia. …

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U.S. Human Rights Report Hails Obama Practices; Report Cites Strides for Minorities, Gays
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