Singer Pleads Guilty to Drug Offenses

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

Singer Pleads Guilty to Drug Offenses


Byline: Jill Lawless Associated Press

LONDON -- It was a slow-motion car crash -- a handy metaphor for George Michael's career.

The multimillion-selling singer was warned Tuesday that he may face jail time after driving his car into a shop while under the influence of drugs.

It was the latest in a string of bizarre automotive and drug-related mishaps that have raised fears for Michael's safety, but done little to dent the 47-year-old's iconic status, which endures more than two decades after he released his best-selling records.

Michael was mobbed by several dozen photographers Tuesday as he arrived at court, where he admitted driving under the influence of drugs and possession of cannabis.

He was charged after plowing his Range Rover into a branch of Snappy Snaps in north London, in the wee hours of July 4. The dent in the wall is still visible, and someone has added one word of graffiti: Wham.

The car's engine was still running when police arrived, but Michael had to be roused, police said.

"Mr. Michael looked at the officer with his eyes wide open and the officers could see his pupils were dilated," said prosecutor Penny Fergusson. "They opened the door and could see he was dripping with sweat."

Prosecutors said Michael acknowledged smoking marijuana and taking a prescription sedative. …

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Singer Pleads Guilty to Drug Offenses
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