Conversations and Proverbs

National Catholic Reporter, August 6, 2010 | Go to article overview

Conversations and Proverbs


Jesuit Fr. Ray Schroth approached his phone interview with Stanley Hauerwas (Page 17) having read that he has a salty, Texas tongue and having been told he is a great conversationalist They hit it off, talking about eschatology, mutual friends at Notre Dame, long-distance running (which both had to give up), how to describe Christ's presence in the Eucharist (Hauerwas recommended P.J. Fitzpatrick's In Breaking of Bread), and how the church could get out of the sex abuse mess. Schroth reports, "The Texan voice was warm and ready to laugh and matched the voice on the memoir's page."

Hauerwas once was named by TIME magazine as "America's Best Theologian." Schroth asked, if TIME were to pick a new best American theologian, who might it be? Hauerwas laughed and confessed that the very idea of a "best" was "stupid," but he praised Robert Jenson, a Lutheran now at the Center for Theological Inquiry in Princeton, N.J., and David Bentley Hart, an Orthodox patristics scholar who writes frequently for First Things.

Schroth, a regular NCR essayist, has been dean at several Jesuit colleges, and has just taken a position with America magazine.

* * *

So frequently we fall short. We see the lengthy distance between the human family we are and the human family we want to become; we see the great gulf between the church we are and the church we dream we should be. This distance, this gulf, appears in some of the news stories and commentaries you will find in this week's issue. Not surprisingly, because journalism attempts to reflect a world that is even as it can highlight people, as we do in this issue, who dream and work to make it otherwise.

In what you might say is a related matter, I find comfort in the proverb: "This, too, shall pass." For me it carries both spiritual and street truth. I've found myself saying it many times, sometimes to others in partial jest. In difficult moments the words hover in my mind. I've taught this proverb to my children. As I began writing this column I did a quick Wikipedia search to learn the origins of this proverb and found several sources taking it back to a Solomon story. Here's one version:

  One day Solomon decided to humble Benaiah ben Yehoyada, his most
  trusted minister. He said to him, "Benaiah, there is a certain ring
  that I want you to bring to me. I wish to wear it for Sukkot, which
  gives you six months to find it. 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Conversations and Proverbs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.