Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

'Once a Budgeter, Always a Budgeter': Five Reviewers for the GFOA's Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program Explain Why Their Interest in and Dedication to Budgeting Continues after They've Retired

By Fishbein, John | Government Finance Review, August 2010 | Go to article overview

'Once a Budgeter, Always a Budgeter': Five Reviewers for the GFOA's Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program Explain Why Their Interest in and Dedication to Budgeting Continues after They've Retired


Fishbein, John, Government Finance Review


TPe GFOA's Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program--which encourages and assists state and local governments in preparing budget documents that are of the highest quality and reflect both the guidelines established by both the National Advisory Council on State and Local Budgeting and the GFOA's best practices--would not be possible without outside reviewers. Many of these individuals continue to volunteer as reviewers for the program after they retire. Below, five reviewers explain why and discuss life after retirement--which includes a continued dedication to their profession.

CONTRIBUTING TO THE PROFESSION

Retirement means many different things, especially to GFOA members who have spent many years doing reviews for the Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program and have continued to review budgets in retirement. Some people might think reviewing budgets in retirement is a mighty peculiar thing. But others find it is enjoyable; if not actually fun. For instance, try to explain budgeting and the GFOA budget review program to some friends who want you to join them for some hospitality during an annual golf trip, but you have a review due at the end of the week and a budget document spread around the floor of your hotel room.

Why do it? Because in retirement, just like in your "active" career, you want to see the best in governmental budgeting and you want to contribute to your profession. Learning from others in this activity is more than imitation and a sincere flattery; it is learning from the wise, applying best practices to your government, hopefully to the satisfaction of the public. With increased expectations for transparency and accountability from the public, more is expected with less, and the budget document is key to meeting those expectations. Presenting a clear, understandable, and accountable plan gives the public the opportunity to participate in a meaningful way. The budget award program does that.

Continuous improvement and peer review by reviewers through the budget award program is critical to the continued development and success of our profession. Participation can help make significant accomplishments in challenging times. We can and should be there for the next generation.

We try to not judge in a review, but advise and assist. We are often called on to give good ideas to peers on how to further improve budgets that are already considered excellent. Alas, there are occasions, especially with first-time submittals, when an applicant is not fully up to award standards. Then the hard work really starts, as you need to give them the benefit of all your years of experience and provide concrete, practical steps for improving their budget presentation and receiving the award with their next submittal. It is always a great pleasure to see agencies you reviewed several years ago make spectacular progress in the art and science of budget preparation and presentation.

When I started my career, I was not sure about being a "budgeter." About 33 years later, I am happy to say that once a budgeter, always a budgeter, and I am good to go for at least 10 more years.--John Farris

'PAYING YOUR DOES' WORKS

I retired from the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission in 2003, after nearly 30 years as its budget manager. The primary job was to prepare and defend the commission's annual budget proposal. The job entailed a good facility with numbers, of course, but also an intricate melding of social and persuasive skills in a political environment. Work program planning and objectives were also important. The greatest benefit of the job was that it was supported by a very skilled set of players. The most intriguing aspect of the job came as part of the management side of a union bargaining team. The role was to try to evaluate the costs of proposals and negotiate the final contract. Here, one faced a very intelligent, committed group whose object was to secure the maximum share of scarce resources within legally defined parameters.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Once a Budgeter, Always a Budgeter': Five Reviewers for the GFOA's Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program Explain Why Their Interest in and Dedication to Budgeting Continues after They've Retired
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.