Charter Schools Finding Niches; Specialization Seen as the Next Wave of Reform

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 30, 2010 | Go to article overview
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Charter Schools Finding Niches; Specialization Seen as the Next Wave of Reform


Byline: Deborah Simmons, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Michiganders are welcoming a first-in-the-nation - a public charter school that trains high-schoolers for careers in the aviation industry.

And youths in the Harlem neighborhood in New York City are being instructed on the importance of civic responsibility and leadership at Democracy Preparatory Charter School.

Whether these schools produce the next Sarah Palin or Benjamin O. Davis Jr., commander of the World War II Tuskegee Airmen, won't be known for years to come, but they definitely reflect the latest trend in the 20-year-old charter-school movement: specialization.

While many of the first-generation charter schools mimicked their public counterparts in structure and scope, many of the second-generation schools are tailor-made, according to subject matter or populations or moral goals.

The movement is beginning to expand and grow as parents figure out that public charters are doing a great deal in closing the achievement gap and offering options that public schools don't, said Peter Groff, executive director of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.

The West Michigan Aviation Academy, which opens in September, is the brainchild of philanthropist Dick DeVos, a school-voucher supporter who paired his passion for flying with tuition-free education. Students will undertake four years of the rigors of traditional academic courses - and lengthier school calendars.

But what works in Harlem and in Grand Rapids, Mich., might not work elsewhere, advocates said, so the best approach to growing the charter movement rests in the hands of parents and their communities, and the marketplace.

It will be interesting to see if businesses try to grow their own work force to figure out where the next Bill Gates will come from, said Mr. Groff, who served until recently in the Obama administration's Education Department.

The Obama administration's role in school reform is the subject of a heated debate among school-choice advocates.

Some say the winners of the Education Department's Race to the Top grants were decided on the basis of how friendly states were to unions and the losers were American children.

I upset my colleagues in the movement, said Jeanne Allen, executive director of the Center for Education Reform. But this 'race' was about whether you had buy-in from unions.

She cited Louisiana and Colorado, reform-minded states that have laws to encourage charter growth, but lost out, and states including Maryland that overregulate charters and impede growth, but won.

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