Art Therapy Benefits Hospice, Dementia Patients

By Birk, Susan | Clinical Psychiatry News, August 2010 | Go to article overview

Art Therapy Benefits Hospice, Dementia Patients


Birk, Susan, Clinical Psychiatry News


CHICAGO -- Whether the activity involves putting brush to paper or assembling images into a collage, expression through the visual arts can powerfully improve the quality of life for people with dementia and terminal illness.

Guided art activities can rekindle a sense of self in people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias by facilitating a reconnection with long-term memories, said Cordula Dick-Muehlke, Ph.D., executive director of the Alzheimer's Family Services Center, Huntington Beach, Calif. For hospice patients, art therapy can afford the opportunity to find meaning and closure through the concrete expression of personal accomplishments, important relationships, and cherished experiences, Katy Barrington, Ph.D., professor of art therapy at the Adler School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, said in a separate presentation.

Profound Meaning

"The process of dying is a unique and vulnerable time for anybody," Dr. Barrington said, and art therapy can provide an excellent catalyst for the expression of thoughts and feelings as hospice patients near the end of life.

She presented the results of a qualitative study of three elderly female hospice patients in rural Wisconsin. The study was based on existential philosophy, which emphasizes the importance of individual responsibility, choices, actions, and self-examination.

With guidance from Dr. Barrington and a hospice social worker over the course of four visits, patients completed a collage in collaboration with a selected loved one based on a story about their lives. She also asked each selected individual to tell a highlighted story that included the patient. The collages were framed and presented to patients and their loved one in the final session.

The process of creating a piece about one's life harmonizes with the goals and principles of hospice, which stress connectedness, dignity, respect for the patients' choices, and giving patients as much control over their lives as possible as they attend to psychological, physical, social, and spiritual concerns, Dr. Barrington said.

Art therapy helps patients cope with anxiety about death and encourages meaningful reminiscence. The latter is particularly valuable because it enables patients to take stock of their contributions and legacies at a time when they might wonder whether they have accomplished anything worthwhile in their lives, she said. Dr. Barrington analyzed the meaning in the finished art pieces using grounded theory, a qualitative research methodology in the social sciences in which data (in this study, patients' comments) are coded and grouped into similar concepts to generate a theory

She said that she anticipated having to "pull" stories out of the three patients. Instead, "all of them unloaded on me . …

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Art Therapy Benefits Hospice, Dementia Patients
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