Blodwen's Bones Set to Stay in England; Owners Reject Plea over Neolithic North Walian

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), September 16, 2010 | Go to article overview

Blodwen's Bones Set to Stay in England; Owners Reject Plea over Neolithic North Walian


Byline: DAVID POWELL

A SKELETON found in Wales and sent to England must stay there, it has emerged.

A Lancashire natural history society which has "custody" of the bones - named Blodwen and found in Llandudno - has decided by five votes to four to keep them.

Dismayed campaigners pledged to fight on to have her returned.

The Neolithic bones dating from 3,510BC were discovered in a Little Orme fissure in the 1890s by an engineer from Bacup and sent to his hometown in Lancashire.

Bacup Natural History Society (NHS) loaned them to Llandudno Museum this summer and met this week to decide her long-term future.

Bacup NHS secretary Ken Bowden told the Daily Post: "The decision has not gone the way you might have hoped.

"After half an hour's discussion, four of us were in favour of it remaining in Llandudno (where it is currently on loan from Bacup), five were against.

"I'm afraid she will have to come back at the end the loan period, as agreed on October 4."

Mr Bowden explained how they arrived at their decision.

"The argument for retaining her in Llandudno was partly that that was where she was discovered, and partly the interest shown by Llandudno museum and supporters." "Against it, the curator of the museum at Bacup pointed out she was an undoubted attraction and people come to the museum, and a particularly vociferous member of the committee said she was donated to Bacup and must stop here. …

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