Pre-Hispanic Period 16th Century 17th Century 18th Century 19th Century 20th Century

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Pre-Hispanic Period 16th Century 17th Century 18th Century 19th Century 20th Century


Know the history of this mestizo drink throughout the years, from its beginnings until today.

The Mexicas used a certain type of edible agave, from which juices were extracted to take the sugar, and they also made a liquor which they called mexcalli.

In 1530, Cristobal de Onate founded the Villa of Tequila.

Spaniards brought upon their arrival the still, a tool that was used to distill the liquid to produce a higher alcohol content liquor which they called vino mezcal.

It is said that in 1600 lived a character called Pedro de Table, Marquis of Altamira, who established the first factory of vino mezcal in La Nueva Galicia.

The court of Guadalajara creates a blockade to regulate the production and trade of vino mezcal, ordering that all proceeds be held to benefit the city.

The port of San Blas is founded and tequila becomes the first product to be exported in what is now Jalisco.

Tequila becomes known and accepted in Mexico City over other mezcals.

Jose Antonio Cuervo buys the Cofradia de las Animas, Jose Guadalupe Cuervo receives the first official concession from Spain to commercialize vino mezcal. Then, Maria Magdalena Cuervo inherits the factory and her husband calls it La Rojena.

Mezcal is subject to bans and censorship from 1785 to 1795.

There are 12 ranches and haciendas in Tequila, and 12 in Amatitan.

The battle for independence begins and the production and sales of mezcal increase.

Jesus Flores, owner of the taverns La Florena, La Puente and La Rojena, is the first to package tequila in glass bottles and jugs

Cenobio Sauza acquires the La Antigua Cruz distillery, which later changed its name to La Perseverancia.

Tequila is recognized as a city, after which the liquid acquires the name of the land.

Production decreases during the Porfirio Diaz regime. Some say that the elitist population preferred French beverages and considered tequila a popular drink. …

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Pre-Hispanic Period 16th Century 17th Century 18th Century 19th Century 20th Century
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