An Overview of Indian Research in Anxiety Disorders

By Trivedi, J.; Gupta, Pawan | Indian Journal of Psychiatry, September 2010 | Go to article overview

An Overview of Indian Research in Anxiety Disorders


Trivedi, J., Gupta, Pawan, Indian Journal of Psychiatry


Byline: J. Trivedi, Pawan. Gupta

Anxiety is arguably an emotion that predates the evolution of man. Its ubiquity in humans, and its presence in a range of anxiety disorders, makes it an important clinical focus. Developments in nosology, epidemiology and psychobiology have led to significant advancement in our understanding of the anxiety disorders in recent years. Advances in pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of these disorders have brought realistic hope for relief of symptoms and improvement in functioning to patients. Neurotic disorders are basically related to stress, reaction to stress (usually maladaptive) and individual proneness to anxiety. Interestingly, both stress and coping have a close association with socio-cultural factors. Culture can effect symptom presentation, explanation of the illness and help-seeking. Importance given to the symptoms and meaning assigned by the physician according to their cultural background also differs across culture. In this way culture can effect epidemiology, phenomenology as well as treatment outcome of psychiatric illness especially anxiety disorders. In this review an attempt has been made to discuss such differences, as well as to reflect the important areas in which Indian studies are lacking. An attempt has been made to include most Indian studies, especially those published in Indian Journal of Psychiatry.

Introduction

Anxiety is arguably an emotion that predates the evolution of man. Its ubiquity in humans, and its presence in a range of anxiety disorders, makes it an important clinical focus. Developments in nosology, epidemiology and psychobiology have significantly advanced our understanding of the anxiety disorders in recent years. Advances in pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of these disorders have brought realistic hope for relief of symptoms and improvement in functioning to patients.

Anxiety Disorders

The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas" (to choke, throttle, trouble, and upset) and encompasses behavioral, affective and cognitive responses to the perception of danger. Anxiety is a normal human emotion. In moderation, anxiety stimulates an anticipatory and adaptive response to challenging or stressful events. In excess, anxiety destabilizes the individual and dysfunctional state results. Anxiety is considered excessive or pathological when it arises in the absence of challenge or stress, when it is out of proportion to the challenge or stress in duration or severity, when it results in significant distress, and when it results in psychological, social, occupational, biological, and other impairment.

Classification of Anxiety Disorders

The DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association) [sup][1] includes the following major categories of anxiety disorders: Panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia), agoraphobia without panic, social phobia (social anxiety disorder), specific phobia, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. DSM-IV also lists anxiety occurring as an adjustment disorder, or secondary to substance abuse or a general medical condition. Finally, anxiety not amounting to a psychiatric diagnosis could be situational in normal persons, or a symptom of another psychiatric disorder.

Why this Review of Anxiety Disorder Research in India

Neurotic disorders are basically related to stress, reaction to stress (usually maladaptive) and individual proneness to anxiety. Interestingly, both stress and coping have close association with socio-cultural factors. Culture can affect symptom presentation, explanation of the illness and help-seeking. Importance given to the symptoms and meaning assigned by the physician according to their cultural background also differ across culture. In this way culture can affect epidemiology, phenomenology as well as treatment outcome of psychiatric illness especially anxiety disorders. …

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