Exhibitions and Gallery Openings

ROM Magazine, Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Exhibitions and Gallery Openings


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October 2, 2010, to January 2, 2011 Feature Exhibition Institute for Contemporary Culture, Roloff Beny Gallery, Michael Lee-Chin Crystal, Level 4

(NEW) El Anatsui: When I Last Wrote to You About Africa

What do grain mortars, evaporated milk tin lids, cassava graters, and railway sleepers have in common? They are just some of the found objects and everyday materials that renowned Ghanaian artist El Anatsui has rendered into strikingly original works. Exhibited from Venice to Havana, his sophisticated pieces combine the diverse histories of African art with more modern influences, often taking the theme of the erosion of inherited traditions. He is widely considered one of Africa's most influential artists.

This October, the ROM's Institute for Contemporary Culture will host the debut of a 40-year retrospective of Anatsui's work. Among the 60 pieces drawn from international collections are sculptures and paintings as well as several of the shimmering massive-scale metallic tapestries for which he's most famous.

Supporting Sponsor: Moira and Alfredo Romano

Organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and supported, in part, by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Until January 2, 2011 Ongoing Exhibition Garfield Weston Exhibition Hall, Michael Lee-Chin Crystal, Level 2B

The Warrior Emperor and China's Terracotta Army

A proper burial ceremony has been a matter of great importance to the Chinese since Neolithic times (about 5000 BCE). An elaborate funeral gave the spirits in the next world, as well as the mourners left behind, a clear idea of the deceased's rank. China's First Emperor pulled out all the stops to ensure his power was known in the realm of the hereafter--700,000 people worked to create his enormous tomb complex and his corps of 8,000 life-sized terracotta warriors.

Ten of these not-to-be-missed life-sized terracotta warriors and horses and hundreds of other funerary items are now on display at the ROM, the largest show of this scope to be exhibited in North America.

Sponsors for ROM presentation:

Presented by: THE ROBERT H. N. HO FAMILY FOUNDATION

Lead Sponsor: BMO Financial Group

Supporting Sponsor: CATHAY PACIFIC

Exhibit Patron: Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP

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This exhibition was organized by the Royal Ontario Museum in partnership with the Shaanxi Provincial Cultural Relics Bureau and the Shaanxi Cultural Heritage Promotion Centre, People's Republic of China, with the collaboration of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Glenbow Museum, Calgary, and the Royal BC Museum, Victoria.

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The Official Guide to the Exhibition $5 (tax included)

Until September 2011 The Patricia Harris Gallery of Textiles & Costume, Michael Lee-Chin Crystal, Level 4

To Dye For: Fashion and Furnishing Textiles

October 2, 2010, to March 27, 2011

Wilson Canadian Heritage Exhibition Room, Sigmund Samuel Gallery of Canada, Weston Family Wing, Level 1

Position As Desired: Exploring African-Canadian Identity

Until May 1, 2011 Ongoing Exhibition Herman Herzog Levy Gallery, Philosophers' Walk Wing, Level 1

Playful Pursuits: Chinese Traditional Toys and Games

Although life was undoubtedly harsh in the remote past, archaeological finds show that from very ancient times the Chinese devised ways to amuse themselves as a respite from toil. …

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