Global Lounge: Crossing Borders A[euro]" Women in the World; in Our Series of Interviews with Senior Managers from around the World, We Catch Up with Rome-Based Wendy Harcourt, Senior Advisor for the Society for International Development, on Her Recent Visit to New Zealand

New Zealand Management, September 2009 | Go to article overview

Global Lounge: Crossing Borders A[euro]" Women in the World; in Our Series of Interviews with Senior Managers from around the World, We Catch Up with Rome-Based Wendy Harcourt, Senior Advisor for the Society for International Development, on Her Recent Visit to New Zealand


Byline: Pauline Herbst

After receiving a PhD in history, Australian-born Wendy Harcourt had to decide whether to stay in liberal Adelaide or become a feminist activist in London. She did neither, instead taking a chance on romance in Italy. Shea[euro]s now lived there since 1988, building an impressive reputation in the areas of gender and development research.

It is hard to define an extensive portfolio career spanning 20 years in a single term, but a snippet from Harcourta[euro]s biodata describes her focus as: a[euro]critical research on and analysis of development policy from a rights and gender perspective with a special interest in sustainable development, globalisation, communication, culture, and sexual and reproductive health and rightsa[euro]. She has taken this research into academic fora, civil society meetings and the United Nations arena as a speaker and organiser of many conferences, workshops and seminars around the world.

As Harcourt explains, growing up with a professor of economics at Cambridge (father) and a psychologist who ran for Parliament and participated in anti-abortion and anti-Vietnam demonstrations (mother) her career choices are hardly surprising.

She says: a[euro]Where else can I place myself? Ia[euro]m in between academia and policy and civil society. My big success is the crossing of borders a[euro]" talking to academics about work thata[euro]s not academic and vice versa. If you dona[euro]t get caught in careers, you can do that a lot.a[euro]

What brings you to New Zealand for the first time?

I came at the invitation of Dr Yvonne Underhill-Sem [the director of the Centre for Development Studies at the University of Auckland] to talk about my new book Body politics in development: critical debates in gender and development, and teach some of her classes. Ia[euro]m interested in the New Zealand environment in relation to womena[euro]s rights and potential womena[euro]s issues.

So whata[euro]s the book about?

Me trying to explain what Ia[euro]ve been doing for 20 years. Ia[euro]ve always been involved in issues around human rights whether safety on student campuses, rape in war, domestic violencea[euro][bar] all of those issues which were an entry point for women to be more aware. Having a womena[euro]s body has commonality.

The question I ask is: a[euro]How is it that the body is so important but in development the body has disappeared a[euro]" its stats and vignettes. Such an important entry point politically for women, it focuses on womena[euro]s economic lives with more community-based body politics and looks at the different ways they have interacted.

How do your external expectations of New Zealand relate to the reality?

It is very beautiful with a lifestyle that you couldna[euro]t afford in Europe. It is a very wealthy country in that sense, with the environment and lifestyle. Ia[euro]ve also noticed ita[euro]s very multi-cultural, especially on campus.

New Zealand has a neo-liberal reputation from outside so I was interested in seeing the new prime minister. We have been astonished by the media and interested in their openness with the political elite. Even though hea[euro]s [John Key] conservative, hea[euro]s talking about social issues.

How have you had to adapt your management style to each of the broad areas you work in?

When youa[euro]re networking for advocacy, feminist dialogue and others, youa[euro]re having to deal with power politics and ask yourself a[euro]where are your entry pointsa[euro]? With gender, trade and development within the EC you have to be careful not to stomp on peoplea[euro]s toes. I was chair of Women in Development Europe (WIDE) from 2004 to 2008 and as chair you have to listen very carefully to people. Ita[euro]s really rewarding but really tough as ita[euro]s not just about research and networking, but about the politics in a group. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Global Lounge: Crossing Borders A[euro]" Women in the World; in Our Series of Interviews with Senior Managers from around the World, We Catch Up with Rome-Based Wendy Harcourt, Senior Advisor for the Society for International Development, on Her Recent Visit to New Zealand
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.