Learning How to LEAD: Verizon Helps New Employees Develop Their Management Potential

By Hutson, Brittany | Black Enterprise, September 2010 | Go to article overview

Learning How to LEAD: Verizon Helps New Employees Develop Their Management Potential


Hutson, Brittany, Black Enterprise


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

MARCUS ALLEN'S ORIGINAL PLAN was to join the military after college, but he changed his mind when he applied to the Verizon Future LEADers Program, a 10-week summer internship. Since interns can return to the program throughout their college years, he participated for four summers, working in areas such as project management, government contracts, budgeting, and diversity training. After completing his fourth year, Verizon Enhanced Communities, a business unit of Verizon Communications Inc. that provides high-speed Internet and telecommunication services for multifamily residences, hired him as a sales coordinator.

Once he took the job, Allen became eligible for the company's Leadership Excellence and Development Program, an 18- to 24-month program designed for entry-level employees. Participants, who are required to have received a bachelor's or master's within the past two years and maintained a 3.0 grade point average, develop valuable management skills and contacts. Hiring managers recommend candidates; if they meet the criteria, they are entered into the program. "LEAD launches careers here at Verizon," says Karessa Burris, a manager of organization development who works with the program. "It transitions them from college to work and helps them to be strategic about their career."

Since LEAD was established in 2003, 440 participants have completed the program, more than half of them people of color; and 37% have been promoted.

In Allen's class, 14 twenty-somethings handle a curriculum that comprises formal and informal learning activities including assessment tools and as many as 12 online and on-site courses in areas such as leading change, time management, presentation skills, communication, and business etiquette. Moreover, they receive mentoring from their peers and from company leaders. To further increase their knowledge of current trends, the participants meet business leaders and industry experts at quarterly conferences.

Allen says he has noticed how the program has improved his leadership skills.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Learning How to LEAD: Verizon Helps New Employees Develop Their Management Potential
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.