Soldiers Eat Bullock a Day

The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia), October 23, 2010 | Go to article overview

Soldiers Eat Bullock a Day


Eat and drink

SNIPPETS from the time of World War II, 1939-1945.

October 10, 1939: Eat a bullock a day. The cooks at the camp in Ipswich Showgrounds stated that "The men can eat Co it takes the equivalent of a good-sized bullock a day to keep them in meat. They are men from the country and west Co he men, tough and hungry".

To feed nearly 600 men, the provisioning involves substantial daily quantities. Typical figures are 400 to 500lbs of bread, about 750lbs of meat, nearly six cwt of potatoes, about 130lbs sugar, over 10 gallons of milk, besides other items.

October 12, 1939: Yesterday the materials for a boxing ring to be used by the men billeted at the Ipswich Showgrounds were delivered and no time lost in erecting it. Its first use however will be as a stage for the Brisbane concert party, which is to entertain the men.

After that it will serve as the boxing tournament to be conducted within the Light Horse regiments.

October 14, 1939: The men of the 25th battalion camped at Enoggera, it was stated, had consumed 2500 bottles of milk. The men of the Ipswich Showgrounds camp probably have put up a proportionately better record. They drank 1056 bottles of milk from October 7 to 14.

All Saints Hall

The official opening of the new hall for All Saints Church of England, Brisbane Road, Booval, took place on Sunday, May 10, 1930.

It was the first function of its kind performed by the Mayor Alderman O Perry, who had been newly elected to that position.

Ald Perry and his wife were greeted by a representative congregation of church people and residents of Booval, and a guard of honour had been formed by members of St Paul's branch of the Girl Guides.

The hall had internal measurements of 80ft x 30ft, well ventilated and with a high-set ceiling.

Seating was provided for 250. There were front and back verandas running the full length of the building and a kitchenette provided at the rear for the convenience of social workers. There was a tennis court at the rear.

In 1910, the church, which had been erected originally at Bundamba, was moved to Cothill Road in an endeavour to meet the convenience of the parishioners in both the Booval and Bundamba centres.

However this scheme had not proved practicable and it was decided to move the church building to the front of the new Brisbane Road property. …

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