Parents Learn How to Teach Kids to Handle Bullying; the Internet and Cell Phones Are Making an Age-Old Problem More Complicated

By Fitzroy, Maggie | The Florida Times Union, October 20, 2010 | Go to article overview

Parents Learn How to Teach Kids to Handle Bullying; the Internet and Cell Phones Are Making an Age-Old Problem More Complicated


Fitzroy, Maggie, The Florida Times Union


Byline: MAGGIE FITZROY

Bullying is a behavior that ridicules, humiliates or harms another person.

There are physical bullies, verbal bullies, relational bullies and cyberbullies who use modern technology to inflict hurt.

Some aspects of bullying are changing because the Internet and cell phones make it easier for cyberbullies to spread messages using text messaging and Facebook.

And more and more kids are bringing cell phones to school with Internet access.

Parents who attended a bullying workshop Thursday evening at Landrum Middle School learned those facts about bullying and more, including how to help their children confront and stop it, whether the taunts are directed at themselves or others.

The hour-long event, presented by national bullying expert Mike Dreiblatt, was sponsored by the Ponte Vedra Public Education Foundation.

Principal Wayne King said the program, which was also presented to students and staff that day, was held "to create awareness" of a problem that is not new, but that is becoming more complex.

At Landrum, "we don't have massive issues with bullying," he said. "But it's deeper than face-to-face anymore."

Dreiblatt, whose company Balance Education Services is based in Vermont, held a total of five workshops that day. He gave hour-long presentations to sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders and an after-school workshop to faculty, during which he focused on helping participants identify, stop and prevent bullying.

At the parent workshop, he presented "bully-proofing plan of action" techniques that parents can teach their children. If bullied in person, it's important for the child to stay calm, tell the bully to stop, and after making quick eye contact, walk away, he said.

He also advised parents how to work with the school if their child is being bullied, including how to set up a safety plan.

Forty-three states have bully prevention laws and Florida is one of them, Dreiblatt said.

If a bullying incident starts on campus, a school is responsible for taking action by coming up with a plan to stop it.

But with the Internet and cell phones, sometimes cyberbullying starts during off-school hours and continues to cause problems during school, Dreiblatt said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Parents Learn How to Teach Kids to Handle Bullying; the Internet and Cell Phones Are Making an Age-Old Problem More Complicated
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.