Improving E-Readiness of Sri Lanka with Supplementary Grid Supplied Electric Power

By Davidrajuh, Reggie; Karamat, Parwaiz et al. | Communications of the IIMA, December 2008 | Go to article overview

Improving E-Readiness of Sri Lanka with Supplementary Grid Supplied Electric Power


Davidrajuh, Reggie, Karamat, Parwaiz, Dhayalan, Velauthapillai, Communications of the IIMA


INTRODUCTION

In November 2002, the government of Sri Lanka launched e-Sri Lanka — the information and communication technology development roadmap to achieve e-governance by the year 2007. According to the official document, the main purpose of e-Sri Lanka is to achieve the desired levels of development by enhancing national competitiveness, and to reduce or eradicate poverty by realizing enhancements in the quality of life of its citizens (Government of Sri Lanka, 2003). The government of Sri Lanka believes that the vision will take the dividends of information and communication technology (ICT) to every village, to every citizen, to every business and also transform the way Government works. However, studies show serious shortcomings in the proposed strategies (Davidrajuh, 2004). Studies also reveal that proper measures for improving e-readiness of Sri Lanka has not been identified or put into practice (Davidrajuh, 2004).

The main purpose of this paper is to identify a micro project that can improve e-readiness of Sri Lanka. To do this, a scientific approach is used in this paper that consists of four steps: First, the proposed strategy by the Government of Sri Lanka is presented; this serves as the needs analysis. Second, from the proposed strategy, requirement analysis is done to draw a set of requirements; this is done using two approaches: a) E-readiness measurement, b) System analysis using the theory of connection. Third, from the requirements, a micro project--supplementary grid supplied electric power--is identified that can improve e-readiness of Sri Lanka; though different types of projects can be chosen, the micro project on grid supplied electric power is people-centric, low-cost, and sustainable.

The uniqueness of this paper lies in the scientific analysis of the proposed strategies for e-Sri Lanka in order to identify the micro project that can be implemented to improve the e-readiness.

NEED ANALYSIS

This paper starts with the need analysis for e-Sri Lanka, as the authors believe that any system cycle or system engineering process should begin with the identification of a need based on a want or desire for something arising from a deficiency (Blanchard & Fabrycky, 1990). The need is this case is the gap between current and desired (or required) level of e-readiness or the gap in results between what is now and what should be after (successful) completion of e-Sri Lanka. Needs analysis is a process of determining the reasons and causes for a need so that appropriate interventions may be identified and later selected.

Rather than using surveys, questionnaires and interviews for the needs analysis, we present or restate the government of Sri Lanka's strategy for e-Sri Lanka. However, the strategy is presented in a highly intelligible format so that requirement analysis and implementation can be done in later sections.

The needs assessment

In November 2002, the government of Sri Lanka launched e-Sri Lanka — the information and communication technology development roadmap to achieve e-governance by the year 2007. Sri Lanka's first ever e-government conference was held in May 2003. The event was given utmost importance by the government of Sri Lanka, and was supported by some of the inter-governmental organizations such as the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Swedish International Development Agency (Sunday Leader, 2003).

According to the official document, the main purpose of e-Sri Lanka is to achieve the desired levels of development, by enhancing national competitiveness, reduce or eradicate poverty by realizing enhancements in the quality of life of its citizens (Government of Sri Lanka, 2003). The government of Sri Lanka believes that the vision will take the dividends of information and communication technology (ICT) to every village, to every citizen, to every business and also transform the way Government works (Sunday Leader, 2003). …

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