A DUTCH MAASTERPIECE! from Roman Ruins and Ancient Caves to Modern Art and Designer Hotels -- the City of Maastricht Offers Perfect Harmony

Daily Mail (London), November 3, 2010 | Go to article overview

A DUTCH MAASTERPIECE! from Roman Ruins and Ancient Caves to Modern Art and Designer Hotels -- the City of Maastricht Offers Perfect Harmony


Byline: by Victoria Gooch

THE MIGHTY Maas waltzes effortlessly between the two sides of the Dutch city of Maastricht -- both markedly different. Rising from the west bank is an old town of Renaissance houses crammed on to cobbled alleys built atop Roman ruins (giving weight to the claim that this is the Netherlands' oldest city).

To the east is the gleamingly hip Wyck-Ceramique area, where antique shops are complemented by contemporary designers.

You can walk from one end of this diminutive city to the other in half an hour, taking in enough sights to make your heart sing.

Being twice as far from Amsterdam as it is from Brussels, the city, in the province of Limburg, feels more Continental than particularly Dutch.

Limburg has only been a permanent part of the Netherlands since 1839. Out on a limb down in the far south of the country, it's resplendent with undulating hills, vineyards and sun.

Add in its multilingual population, proximity to the German and Belgian (both the Flemish and Walloon regions are within easy reach of the centre) borders and international institutes, including the University of the United Nations, and it's no wonder the European Union was born here in 1992 when the Maastricht Treaty was signed.

If you have time to spare, its location is perfect for countryhopping.

you could start the day in Maastricht, follow the river south to the Belgian Ardenne, lunch in northern France, a digestif in Luxembourg, then wend your way back through western Germany. How sjiek (great), as they say here.

But if you're only here for a weekend, save it for another trip as the city itself will more than satisfy.

Maastricht is home to worldclass galleries, fairs and festivals, and exquisite shopping streets filled with boutiques.

It also has more pubs than there are days in the year -- music to the ears of the 13,000 students here.

Speaking of music, a tune has it that 'Maastricht is the city for fun and for song', and nowhere is that better encapsulated than at Andre Rieu's annual summer concerts in the grand, leafy Vrijthof Square.

Here, when the local-boyturned-global-superstar performs with his orchestra under a twinkling sky, I'm told it's like the Last Night Of The Proms.

Apparently, he brings out great emotion in his audience, especially when he plays in his hometown.

To me, it's this sense of deep pride among locals that makes the city so appealing. The former Roman settlement manages to preserve its history, while welcoming the modern.

ALMOST every one of its 1,450 monuments and historic buildings -- nearly as many as Amsterdam -- has a current use.

Take my accommodation, the Kruisheren Hotel, a converted 15th-century monastery that makes spectacular use of the box-within-a-box idea, leaving its gothic interior intact while spaceage lighting and modern art vie with the original frescoes and stained-glass windows.

Just off Grote Staat, one of the main shopping streets, is a similar renovation project. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A DUTCH MAASTERPIECE! from Roman Ruins and Ancient Caves to Modern Art and Designer Hotels -- the City of Maastricht Offers Perfect Harmony
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.