TALES OF THE WILD WEST; Story Behind Tees Hero Who Fought in American Civil War - and Had Links to Buffalo Bill

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), November 8, 2010 | Go to article overview

TALES OF THE WILD WEST; Story Behind Tees Hero Who Fought in American Civil War - and Had Links to Buffalo Bill


Byline: MIKE MORGAN

A TEESSIDE author has written a Gone With The Wind-style yarn about a Middlesbrough man who not only fought in the American Civil War, but also had a connection with Buffalo Bill's famous Wild West Show.

Harry Dixon Jessop was a larger-than-life character who, aged just 15, joined a ship and sailed to make his fortune in America.

On arrival, livewire Harry jumped ship. But things went badly awry when he was conscripted into the Confederate Army and had to fight as an elite cavalryman for a cause he did not believe in - slavery.

Author Chris Carter, 52, of Thornton Street, North Ormesby, became fascinated with Jessop's story after seeing his grave in Linthorpe Cemetery.

He said: "Despite having to fight for supporters of slavery, unlike many, he stayed loyal to his friends and comrades fighting in many of the Southern states.

"He took part in the sieges of Atlanta (of Gone With The Wind fame) and Savannah and, in one of the last acts of the war, his regiment acted as escort to rebel President Jefferson Davis during his flight through the Carolinas.

"He came through the war unscathed, although he saw some terrible sights."

One of the many savage conflicts Harry was involved in was the Battle of Fort Sanders, fought on December 29, 1863 in Tennessee, as part of the Confederate's attempt to stop General Sherman marching on Chattanooga.

After the war, Harry made his way back to Hull, eventually building his own business as a stevedore in Middlesbrough.

He helped load the ship at Hull docks used by one of the Buffalo Bill Wild West shows touring Britain in the late 1800s. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

TALES OF THE WILD WEST; Story Behind Tees Hero Who Fought in American Civil War - and Had Links to Buffalo Bill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.