Using SOLO to Evaluate an Educational Virtual Environment in a Technology Education Setting

By Padiotis, Ioannis; Mikropoulos, Tassos A. | Educational Technology & Society, July 2010 | Go to article overview

Using SOLO to Evaluate an Educational Virtual Environment in a Technology Education Setting


Padiotis, Ioannis, Mikropoulos, Tassos A., Educational Technology & Society


Introduction

Technology education constitutes a separate educational sector of the educational system. Generally, by the term Technology Education (TE) we refer to that particular part of the curriculum that is related to the support offered to students in becoming technologically capable, to the identification of the human needs for which technological solutions are required, to the design and manufacture of suitable products, to the evaluation of product quality and potential social and environmental repercussions (De Vries, 1997, 2005; De Vries & Tamir, 1997). Today TE is undergoing an important transformation. The increasing complexity of society has resulted in a shift of interest from the acquisition of manual skills towards the development of mental skills. The curricula of technological studies in developed countries are changing direction and from providing specific knowledge and practicing skills, emphasis is given to the procedures of problem solving, decision making on technological matters and knowledge of the productive processes (DFE, 1993; ITEA, 2000). Technology educators have to bring together scientific, technological and social knowledge (De Vries, 1997).

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are considered to be the most powerful tool for the support of the learning process. ICT with their flexibility, adaptability, their capability of being applied at the work place, their good cost-performance ratio, are being used widely in TE as learning tools. From the various technological approaches of ICT, Virtual Reality (VR) is considered to be the most powerful learning tool, because of its unique characteristics that can be summarized as follows (Mikropoulos & Bellou, 2006):

* creation of three dimensional (3D) spatial representations, namely virtual environments

* multisensory channels for user interaction

* immersion of the user in the virtual environments (VEs)

* intuitive interaction through natural manipulations in real time.

The present work proposes the design, development and evaluation of an Educational Virtual Environment (EVE) in TE for the support of the understanding of the milk production processes as a case study, in a technical school of secondary education. The aim of this study is to investigate the contribution of the proposed EVE to the development of the four different types of technological conceptual knowledge, namely knowledge of the physical nature; knowledge of the functional nature; knowledge of the relationship between the physical and the functional nature, and the process knowledge (De Vries, 2005). For the evaluation of knowledge construction after the EVE-supported intervention, the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) taxonomy is used (Biggs & Collis, 1982).

Literature Review

Over the last years a number of VR applications have appeared aimed at the support of the educational process in the field of Technology Education. TE includes a vast number of fields of application such as industry, manufacturing, energy, and transportation; therefore the virtual environments concern a wide variety of applications.

Weyrich & Drewes (1999) have developed a desktop VR system for training in the planning and manufacture of model products, without presenting any empirical data. Parkinson & Hudson (2002) report on the training of 14-16 year old students in the manufacture of automobiles using a desktop system, and found some improvement in the generic process of engineering design. Yap et al. (2003) propose an immersive system for training in the development of industrial products. Their results show a reduction in the design time and the design of more precise products. Hashemipour et al. (2009) present a virtual computer integrated manufacturing laboratory for various engineering disciplines. They report on positive students' attitudes and learning outcomes in undergraduate courses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Using SOLO to Evaluate an Educational Virtual Environment in a Technology Education Setting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.