Return the Constitution to the People; Kill the Constitutional Convention Requirement

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Return the Constitution to the People; Kill the Constitutional Convention Requirement


Byline: James W. Lucas, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

All of the discussion of how the newly empowered Republicans in Congress will interface with the newly empowered Tea Party has overlooked one issue that could prove more fundamental than all of the others. The Tea Party clearly wishes to seize the opening provided by the recent elections to advance many of its supporters' views of the proper constitutional role of the federal government. Certainly conservatives in 1964, 1980 and 1994 also protested the extent to which the federal government had overreached its original constitutional bounds. However, in the Tea Party universe, constitutional concerns now seem to occupy a more visible position than for its predecessors.

This is manifested in more than rally placards and a copy of the Constitution in every Tea Party pocket. The Contract With America had to promise to reference constitutional authority for every congressional enactment. Many probably regarded talk about adhering to the Constitution as a code for not enacting sweeping new government programs such as Obamacare. However, in the view of many Tea Party constitutionalists, adhering to the Constitution goes far beyond that. By their strict-constructionist reading of the Constitution, most of what the federal government did even before the Obama, Pelosi and Reid triumvirate took power exceeded the federal government's constitutional authority.

In addition, talk of reforming the Constitution itself is emerging. The term-limits and balanced-budget amendments aborted by Congress and the Supreme Court in the 1990s have returned. Other constitutional reforms are discussed regularly in many Tea Party precincts, such as the repeal of the 17th Amendment or the first sentence of the first section of the 14th Amendment (although it is the hopelessly vague language of the second sentence that has been most abused by the Supreme Court to make itself into an unaccountable and irreversible superlegislature). Other proposals call for amendments allowing states to repeal acts of Congress and/or Supreme Court decisions or reining in a limitless federal police power that has been created by the Supreme Court's seemingly infinite expansion of the Interstate Commerce Clause.

Some are even calling for a constitutional convention, invoking a dormant aspect of Article V of the Constitution, which provides that two-thirds of the states can require Congress to call a convention for the purpose of formulating amendment proposals. …

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