Now Men Lose out from Gender Divide; Women 'Ahead on Health and Job Security'

Daily Mail (London), October 12, 2010 | Go to article overview

Now Men Lose out from Gender Divide; Women 'Ahead on Health and Job Security'


Byline: Steve Doughty Social Affairs Correspondent

WOMEN are outstripping men in a dozen ways that mean their lives are often better, the state equality watchdog found yesterday.

It said women are more likely to be well educated, less likely to lose their jobs in the recession, and more likely to look after their health by visiting their GP or eating fruit and vegetables.

Men don't live as long as women, are more likely to be overweight and are three times more likely to take their own lives, the report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission said. The advantages for women were listed in the Commission's 700-page report on progress towards an equal society.

The organisation, led by Trevor Phillips, listed groups of people who it said are losing out and for whom Mr Phillips said 'the gateways to opportunity appear permanently closed'.

The report pointed to the gender pay gap which shows women generally earn less.

But, Mr Phillips said, other aspects of the equality audit show we have 'moved light years in our attitudes to all kinds of human difference'.

The report, How Fair Is Britain?, shows that in a series of areas men can now be considered the disadvantaged sex. They are more likely to be victims of crime than women, the report said. A high proportion of murder victims are men, and men are more likely to be assaulted than women.

It found that men are more likely to be killed in an accident at work: in 2009 only four women died in industrial accidents compared with 129 men.

The Commission added: 'Girls outperform boys routinely in education at age five, at age 16 and at degree level throughout Britain.'

It said: 'The recent recession has hit some groups harder than others. As in most countries, men have been more adversely affected than women.'

Only 15 per cent of male jobs are in the public sector - where pay and pensions are higher and jobs have so far been more secure - as opposed to 40 per cent of women's jobs.

Disabled men are also far less likely to have work now than in the past, the report said.

The report said the pay gap between men and women continued to be a 'pernicious earnings penalty'.

It added: 'Women now do better than men in every aspect of educational qualification but the pay gap between men and women remains. After falling continuously for the past 30 years, progress seems to have halted. …

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Now Men Lose out from Gender Divide; Women 'Ahead on Health and Job Security'
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