On the Assumption That We Needed to Fix Them

By Rader, Rick | The Exceptional Parent, June 2009 | Go to article overview

On the Assumption That We Needed to Fix Them


Rader, Rick, The Exceptional Parent


There are over 5,700 hospitals in the United States, and the best one sadly closed down.

Granted, this one never made it to the "official" list of the 100 Best Hospitals in the U.S. that is promoted by several national magazines, but it's hard to dispute its standing.

It didn't close down for lack of patients; patients came from all over the world for treatment. It closed down due to losing its stellar surgeon, who sadly passed away at age 83 in early May of this year.

Irving Chais told The New York Times in 1990, "We've been in business since 1900 and never lost a patient yet." Chais was the owner and chief surgeon of the New York Doll Hospital where he repaired dolls for children, collectors, museums, and dealers.

Dennis Hevesi in The New York Times said, "Irving Chais spent 45 years as the owner and chief surgeon of the New York Doll Hospital in Manhattan where he reattached thousands of heads, arms and legs; reimplanted fake hair shorn by scissor-wielding toddlers; and soothed the feelings of countless doll lovers, young and old."

In his cluttered workshop, he had boxes labeled hands, fingers, wrists, wigs, German eyes, French eyes, American eyes. None of the boxes contained hearts or souls; those were supplied by their owners.

Some of the "patients" have been in the same family for five and six generations. Playing with dolls has been part of the human experience since prehistoric times. Dolls have often been found in Egyptian graves dating back to 2,000 B.C., leading experts to believe that they were cherished possessions. For centuries, rag dolls were made by mothers for their children.

Dolls play a key role in a child's early exposure to the joys of caring, connecting, and parenting. Young girls mimic their parents in dressing them, grooming them, rocking them. and embracing them. Child developmental psychologists believe these early experiences help prepare young girls to embrace their eventual role as real parents.

When I teach students (medical, dental, special education, counseling, and even engineering) about the challenges experienced by parents caring for children with disabilities and special healthcare needs, I often ask the question, "When do you think the stress of being an exceptional parent begins?" Do they think it begins when they are told by the pediatrician that something is wrong? Do they think it begins when the parents start to notice that this child responds quite differently from their first child? Do they think it begins when the grandparent points out some concerns or they observe their child at a play date? The students align themselves with all of the scenarios but historically nod at the suggestion that when the physician delivers the "bad news" that's when the stress begins.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

On the Assumption That We Needed to Fix Them
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.