Hi-Speed Soldier

By Ryan, Jini | Soldiers Magazine, November 2010 | Go to article overview

Hi-Speed Soldier


Ryan, Jini, Soldiers Magazine


IT seemed unlikely, but there he was.

The rearview mirror reflected the slightly vibrating image of Adam Poppenhouse's eagerness; the glint in his eyes, the small smile on his face. The Mitsubishi Evo MR shuddered as he licked a switch to engage the paddle shifters. The engine revved and the car leaped forward. The 23-year-old Army veteran was right where he wanted to be: behind the wheel of a fast car.

"When I first bought it, it was really fast and then I got used to it, so I needed to make it go faster," Poppenhouse said.

Fast cars are his passion, one the mechanics at Atlantic Motor Sports share and indulge. The mechanics have upgraded everything around the motor. They've

put a big turbo on it, bigger camshafts, new cooling aspects for the transmission, and even tuned the onboard computers to make this vehicle racetrack-ready.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

A stock Evo can push 163 mph; Poppenhouse's car is faster. In fact, when asked how fast he can go, he responded, "Crazy fast! I honestly don't even know."

Since he has unquestioning faith in the skills of the Atlantic Motor Sports mechanics, Poppenhouse makes the 322-mile drive from Stow, Ohio to Gaithersburg, Md., regularly so they can work on his car. While an average driver needs more than six hours to cover that distance, Poppenhouse does it in less than five.

Poppenhouse was serving as a gunner and vehicle commander with the 3rd Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division in Iraq, when he found the car of his dreams. "I'd just got the latest Motor Trend in the mail from my wife

and I was reading it and they did a story about this car and right then and there, I read the article and just told myself, if I made it back, I was going to buy myself one."

Pointing to the sleek front end, Atlantic Motor Sports shop foreman Cory Peterson described some of the tweaks they've made to the car. "Adam had the headlights tinted just to give it a little more ... I believe he calls it the storm trooper look." Ducking under the hood of the car, Peterson tapped a key component. "We also upgraded the boost controller on it. We changed the stock boost solenoid to an after market electronic boost solenoid."

"Adam was waiting for the MR version of this car to come out, which has the paddle shifters in it," Peterson said, "and that allowed him to not have to deal with the clutch pedal."

A traditional clutch pedal wouldn't work for Poppenhouse; he lost both his legs in Iraq.

"We were leaving the area to go back to the FOB (forward operating base) to refit and refuel, and the insurgents they had some IEDs (improvised explosive devices) and an ambush waiting. So, they hit us on the way out."

Poppenhouse was medically evacuated from Iraq to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, and then brought to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. He lost his right leg below the knee in the blast. Doctors tried to save his left leg, but eventually, he elected to have it amputated above the knee.

"My right leg, I lost it above the knee, so I have quite a long prosthetic, and I take that one off," he explained as he detached the prosthetic limb. "I have a quick-release called a Ferrier coupler. I just take it of with a key and I drive with my left foot with my left prosthetic."

"The transmission, it acts just like a manual," Poppenhouse said as he gestured toward his legs. "In my situation, I can't use a clutch, so it has paddle shifters on the steering wheel that I can shift gears with. …

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