Change and the Credible Company: Roger D'Apri'x's New Look Outlines How Robust Programs Can Meet the Complex Change Communication Needs of Organizations

By D'Aprix, Roger | Communication World, March-April 2009 | Go to article overview

Change and the Credible Company: Roger D'Apri'x's New Look Outlines How Robust Programs Can Meet the Complex Change Communication Needs of Organizations


D'Aprix, Roger, Communication World


In his new book, The Credible Company: Communicating with Today's Skeptical Workforce, consultant and author Roger D'Aprix, ABC, IABC Fellow, recommends robust communication programs to meet the complex change communication needs of the workforce--particularly now, as the global financial crisis and recession threaten the well-being of companies and employees alike.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The following excerpts from The Credible Company high light points from the book's mare chapters. The first letters of each chapter title spell the acronym INFORMS, and each chapter discusses an area that communication professionals need to address to help their organizations reach employees.

Information

The challenge for the communication profession is to determine how to use and manage information thoughtfully and efficiently and to deliver it properly to a skeptical audience--an audience already drowning in raw information in a time-pressured world where they are often stretched close to the breaking point. We need to be cautious about adding to that deluge of raw information as opposed to information that has been tested for insight, truthfulness, accuracy and value.

Technology, with all of its profound advantages, has opened up a Pandora's box and revolutionized the way we interact in organizations and the ways in which we will do business going forward. It has also raised expectations as well as perplexing questions about the proper role of the internal communication professional in relating to it and to effective information management and delivery.

Perhaps ... the mitigating factor that will allow us to manage both information and technology appropriately will be the business and human needs of its users. That's the real goal we should be pursuing.

Needs of the audience

Whatever else we can say about the communication process in organizations, it's clear that in the final analysis it's all about people and what they need and want to know. That sounds so obvious that it should not need to be pointed out, but it's amazing how often human needs for communication in organizations are ignored.

Truthful and effective communication requires, above all, an understanding of the audience. All communication strategy and tactics should focus on, as a first cause, what information the audience wants and needs....

What's interesting is the commonality in all of [the research on employee communication needs]. Intelligent communication professionals need to study such data and ensure that their counsel and their various strategies are consistent with the well-documented human needs on the job. In particular, that requires careful attention to communication as the holistic and dynamic process it really is in the workplace. It's not simply internal journalism; it's attention to a process that is closely allied with the entire issue of organizational leadership and the requirement to lead people responsibly and effectively if we want results.

Face-to-face

It's tempting ... for the professional communicator to presume that effective face-to-face communication is none of her business. Those who define their responsibility as simply the keeper of employee media are especially prone to this view. The trouble is, employees rarely see such media, including the company intranet, as their primary communication sources in the company.

I often run focus groups in which I ask the participants to identify their primary internal and external communication sources for what is going on in the company, as well as company priorities.... It's always instructive that the initial responses all have to do with things like meetings, teams on which they serve, their bosses, coworkers, and other live-and-in-person sources. After several minutes, they may or may not identify the various company media as sources, and when they do it's usually with a dismissive tone. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Change and the Credible Company: Roger D'Apri'x's New Look Outlines How Robust Programs Can Meet the Complex Change Communication Needs of Organizations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.