Binge Drinking Data Back Need for Interventions

By Napoli, Denise | Clinical Psychiatry News, November 2010 | Go to article overview

Binge Drinking Data Back Need for Interventions


Napoli, Denise, Clinical Psychiatry News


Nearly one-quarter of high school students reported binge drinking in 2009, as did more than 25% of adults aged 18-34 years.

These findings, published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's report, are essentially unchanged from similar surveys conducted in 1993, wrote the authors, and indicate a need for community-specific, evidence-based interventions (MMWR 2010;59:1-6).

"Although most binge drinkers are not alcohol dependent or alcoholics, they often engage in this high-risk behavior without realizing the health and social problems of their drinking. States and communities need to consider further strategies to create an environment that discourages binge drinking," said Dr. Robert Brewer in a written statement. Dr. Brewer is the alcohol program leader at CDC and one of the authors of the report.

The CDC analyzed data from two sources. The first was the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, conducted among adults aged 18 years and older on both landline and cellular telephones. The second was the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, filled out anonymously by students while in school.

The adult survey defined binge drinking as the consumption of 4 or more alcoholic drinks per occasion for women and 5 or more drinks per occasion for men during the preceding 30 days. Among the students, binge drinking was 5 or more drinks within "a couple of hours" in the preceding 30 days.

Among the landline respondents, the overall prevalence of binge drinking among adults in 2009 was 15.2% (compared to 14.2% in 1993), with more men reporting binge drinking than women (20.7% versus 10.0%, respectively). Among respondents aged 18-24, prevalence was 25.6%; among those aged 25-34, it fell slightly to 22.5%, and continued to decline with age.

Among the cellular respondents, the prevalence of binge drinking was slightly higher: 20.6% overall, with 26.5% for men and 14.5% for women. Among the 18- to 24-year age group, 35.4% reported binge drinking. As with the landline respondents, decline in prevalence continued with increase in age to 30.8% among 25-to 34-year-olds, and a further steady decline afterward.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Binge Drinking Data Back Need for Interventions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.