GOP Stops Attempt to Overturn 'Don't Ask'; Senate Fails to Pass Bill for Military Policy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 10, 2010 | Go to article overview

GOP Stops Attempt to Overturn 'Don't Ask'; Senate Fails to Pass Bill for Military Policy


Byline: Sean Lengell, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Republicans effectively ended the Democrats' last chance to overturn the military's ban on gay troops Thursday in a procedural vote that likely puts the issue beyond Congress' reach for the foreseeable future.

The 57-40 tally left Democrats three votes shy of the 60 needed to overcome a filibuster and begin debate on the defense policy bill. Instead, the Senate won't pass a defense bill for the first time in decades - which Democrats said jeopardizes troops' pay raises, as well as leaving the don't ask, don't tell policy in place.

Democrats were racing to act before the end of the year, when the GOP - which is generally opposed to overturning the policy - takes control of the House and ends the chances for action.

The vote was along party lines except for two switchers - moderate Sen. Susan Collins, Maine Republican, who supported the measure, and Sen. Joe Manchin III, West Virginia Democrat, who voted no.

President Obama said he was extremely disappointed with the Senate's action and urged senators to revisit the issue before its late year lame duck session ends.

As commander in chief, I have pledged to repeal this discriminatory law," the president said. "A great majority of the American people agree. This law weakens our national security, diminishes our military readiness and violates fundamental American principles of fairness, integrity and equality.

Senators pushing to change the law say there is a chance to try again in the remaining days of the lame-duck session by introducing a stand-alone bill.

I am 100 percent supportive of the stand-alone bill, said Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl Levin, Michigan Democrat.

But with the year winding down and with the Senate still facing several other key votes, including the proposed extension of Bush-era tax cuts, such an scenario appears a long shot. Another shot at repeal could be achieved only if Congress stays in session beyond its self-imposed Dec. 17 adjournment.

More likely is that the fight moves to the courts, where a federal judge has already struck down the policy, though his ruling has been stayed while the matter is under appeal.

This issue is one that we are going to have to deal with sooner or later, Ms. Collins said. The courts are ruling in a way that appears evident that this issue .. is eventually going to get to the Supreme Court

Gay-rights advocates said they are continuing to press for action this year, but they also said they will pressure Mr. Obama to use executive powers to stop the dismissal of gay troops.

Since it appears Congress won't repeal the law this year, the fate of lesbian and gay service members now rests in President Obama's hands, Human Rights Campaign President Joe Solmonese said in a letter to supporters Thursday.

To make good on his commitment to end 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' in 2010, President Obama needs to immediately issue a stop-loss order halting military discharges. At the same time, the administration must immediately cease defending DADT in federal court.

Mr. Levin defended the timing of Thursday's vote, saying that Republicans had months to work with Democrats on a deal and that Mr. Reid was forced to act now because the 2010 legislation calendar was winding down.

There simply was no time to complete a bill including repeal of 'don't ask, don't tell' if we didn't start work now, Mr. Levin said.

Ms. Collins, the lone Republican to vote against the filibuster, was incensed at Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid for prematurely calling the vote before a deal on GOP amendments could be worked out.

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GOP Stops Attempt to Overturn 'Don't Ask'; Senate Fails to Pass Bill for Military Policy
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