World Timelines: Http://www.Worldtimelines.Org.Uk/

By Bradnock, Marianne | School Librarian, Winter 2010 | Go to article overview
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World Timelines: Http://www.Worldtimelines.Org.Uk/


Bradnock, Marianne, School Librarian


'Have you ever looked at an exhibit in a museum and wondered what was happening in other countries at that time?' That is the challenge thrown out by World Timelines, a British Museum site which puts 2,000 artefacts from ten museums around the British Isles in their geographical and chronological context via its own timeline viewer. It requires Flash Player 7, but that is unlikely to be a problem for many users nowadays.

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The timelines are organised broadly by continent, and include detailed information about objects from Palaeolithic times to the end of the 20th century. By clicking on a region of the world you can follow the timeline to see what was happening there at any point in history. As in the recent successful Radio 4 series and its accompanying website, A History of the World in 100 Objects (reviewed in the Autumn issue of ict@sla), this is a way of learning about the history of the world via objects and the people who used them.

Selecting a region and/or period will launch the timeline in a separate window. You can drag with your mouse along the timeline to move backward and forward in time, and as you select the events of a particular period links to associated objects appear in an adjoining pane. The period AD 43-410 in England, for example, is illustrated by a lead pipe, a bronze head of the Emperor Hadrian, a wall painting from the Roman villa at Lullingstone in Kent, and a silver pepper pot found in Suffolk. As well as descriptions of each of these objects, they are used as a starting point for background information on the conquest and organisation of Roman Britain, Roman emperors in Britain, Christianity in Britannia and the end of Roman Britain. The text is clearly written with, as you would expect, an emphasis on archaeological finds and the evidence they provide. It is a simple matter to open other timelines to view objects and events in the same period for a particular region of England, or for Ireland, Scotland or Wales, whose military conquest is evidenced by part of a tiled roof from near Wrexham.

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World Timelines: Http://www.Worldtimelines.Org.Uk/
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