Using Social Media Can Be Successful Internet Marketing

By Hall, Chuck | The Florida Times Union, December 11, 2010 | Go to article overview

Using Social Media Can Be Successful Internet Marketing


Hall, Chuck, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Chuck Hall

While we were busy creating websites and marketing businesses over the Internet last month, I was using social media in unique ways that I thought would make for some interesting reading.

As you might remember, we use social media - Facebook, Twitter, etc. - as one of our very effective tools to share our clients' businesses with the world. It's affordable, and it's easy to start using, but there is so much more. Let me explain:

As you may have heard, advertising has changed a lot over the past 10 years, and the Internet has been largely responsible for that.

Traditional forms of media have lost a large market share of revenue dollars, and much of that money has shifted to various forms of Internet marketing. Social media provide a stealthy way to market, and since it is next on our list of tools, let's jump into it now.

Because of space, it is impossible for me to discuss in detail each of the 10 different social media sites that we use at our offices.

Each site has different rules and ways to share your communications. Facebook will allow some actions that Twitter cannot, such as amount of text allowed. Twitter has a limit of 140 characters allowed, so the form of communication is far different than Facebook.

In Facebook, however, you can write volumes to share, post movies, etc.

Seems that Twitter was designed for the mobile market; you know, the guy on the go with his smart phone. Some predict that we web designers will have to switch over to mobile designing soon, as the market for computers will shrink to very little.

Because the Internet changes so fast - and this might be hard to digest - the days of Facebook and Twitter are surely numbered. Consider that MySpace was THE top social media site, even before the term "social media" was penned.

However, the public has since moved by the millions to Facebook, leaving MySpace in a floundering mess in only two years.

It would be foolish to think that Facebook has a permanent place in the No. 1 slot. The public is fickle, and tomorrow is another day.

Anyway, let's talk about some of the tricks that allow a small business to gain some traction by marketing with these social sites.

Let's use an example of a fellow who sells widgets in his store. He wants to use the Internet. He reads on social media sites about other businesses gaining sales, so he figures, "Why not?" and gives it a try.

Talking about your widgets to the public, even on a social media site, is like running an ad. It is all a one-way conversation: You, the business, preaching your values to potential buyers. This has all changed now, and you should take notice. …

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