Senate

By Belzile, Marie-Eve | Canadian Parliamentary Review, Winter 2010 | Go to article overview

Senate


Belzile, Marie-Eve, Canadian Parliamentary Review


The Senate began its fall session J. one day earlier than planned: the Speaker reconvened the Upper Chamber on September 27 at 6:00 p.m. rather than on September 28 at 2:00 p.m., as had been proposed in July. The first few weeks of the session focused on the swearing in of the new Governor General.

Governor General

During its first week back in session, the Senate hosted a special ceremonial event. The Right Honourable David Johnston, the 28th Governor General of Canada since Confederation, was sworn in on October 1 in the Senate Chamber before his family, the Prime Minister of Canada, members of Cabinet, many dignitaries, Senators and Members of Parliament.

Since Canada is both a constitutional monarchy and a parliamentary democracy, the Governor General is appointed by the Queen on the advice of the Prime Minister. The Governor General's parliamentary duties include convening Parliament after each general election, opening a session of Parliament by delivering the Speech from the Throne and granting Royal Assent to bills passed by the Senate and the House of Commons. Each of these activities takes place as part of a ceremony for which Parliament (the Governor General, the Senate and the House of Commons) meets in the Senate Chamber. The swearing-in ceremony for a new Governor General also takes place in the Chamber. The only time Parliament does not meet in the Senate Chamber for these duties is when Royal Assent is granted by written declaration.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Legislation

The majority of the Government bills introduced in the Senate during the fall session are currently either at second reading or the committee stage. Bill S-12, A third Act to harmonize federal law with the civil law of Quebec and to amend certain Acts in order to ensure that each language version takes into account the common law and the civil law, was read for the first time on October 20. Bill C-14, An Act to amend the Electricity and Gas Inspection Act and the Weights and Measures Act, and Bill S-13, An Act to implement the Framework Agreement on Integrated Cross- Border Maritime Law Enforcement Operations between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States of America, were introduced in the Senate on October 26.

Bill C-40, An Act to establish National Seniors Day, which was read for the first time in the Senate on June 17, 2010, was sponsored by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, Senator Marjory LeBreton. As Bill C-40 was not controversial and was in line with the commitments made in the 2010 Throne Speech, it moved quickly through the Senate. The bill passed third reading on October 26 without debate, becoming the first bill of the season waiting for Royal Assent.

Committee reports

A large part of the work accomplished by the Senate takes place in committee. The reports prepared in committee, whether special studies or legislative reports, complement the legislative duties of parliamentarians. In September and October 2010, the various Senate committees reviewed over a dozen bills, in addition to the orders of reference passed by the Senate for special studies on social, legal and economic issues.

On September 28, the Senate adopted the fourth report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence, an interim report entitled Where We Go from Here: Canada's Mission in Afghanistan. On October 28, the Senate adopted, on motion of Senator Dennis Dawson, the fourth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications, entitled Plan for a Digital Canada. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Senate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.