Nursing Home Residents Who Reject Care Require Screening

By Boschert, Sherry | Clinical Psychiatry News, December 2010 | Go to article overview

Nursing Home Residents Who Reject Care Require Screening


Boschert, Sherry, Clinical Psychiatry News


LONG BEACH, CALIF. -- Rejection of care by nursing home residents was associated with four potentially modifiable factors in an analysis of data on 3,230 residents.

Clinicians should screen for the conditions - delusion, delirium, minor or major depression, and severe or worse pain - when residents reject care such as taking medications and accepting assistance with activities of daily living, Dr. Shinya Ishii and associates reported in the top prize-winning poster presentation at the meeting.

If the associations observed in the study are causal, appropriate interventions may improve residents' willingness to accept care, the researchers suggested. The team analyzed data on residents scheduled for Minimum Data Set assessments in 71 nursing homes in eight states. Nurses identified residents who were rejecting care.

The likelihood of doing so increased fourfold in the presence of delusion and doubled in the presence of delirium, depression, or severe-to-horrible pain, reported Dr. Ishii of the Department of Veterans Affairs' geriatric research education and clinical center, Los Angeles.

Among the 312 residents who exhibited rejection-of-care behaviors, 18% had delusions, 35% had delirium, 32% had minor depression, 15% had major depression, and 30% had severe to "horrible" pain. Some symptoms overlapped. An attributable-risk analysis suggested that 19% of care-rejecting behavior could be eliminated if delusions were stopped and that 5% of care rejection might end if delirium were reversed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nursing Home Residents Who Reject Care Require Screening
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.