'Coaching Classes:' Gateway to a Bright Career

By Avadhani, Ramesh | The World and I, November 2010 | Go to article overview

'Coaching Classes:' Gateway to a Bright Career


Avadhani, Ramesh, The World and I


One aspect of education in India that's becoming more and more conspicuous is the plethora of 'coaching classes.' Be it Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai or even a smaller town like Lucknow, you can't fail to see them--either advertised on a billboard or in the local newspaper. I assumed that such classes were almost always conducted by retired school or college teachers but I was in for a big surprise when I went to meet a couple of them.

Take the case of Sanjay Kumar Singh who runs the rather grandiosely named Albert Einstein Classes in Lucknow. Soon after post graduation in physics, Sanjay appeared for the reputed Indian Administrative Services entrance examination but failed to score the required marks. Undeterred, he wrote the exams again the following year--and failed. Realizing he hadn't obtained appropriate guidance for the examination, he decided to help students succeed in such competitive examinations. "That's how my coaching institute was born. My failure led me to success."

He and his colleague, the rather stern-looking DK Singh who teaches computer science, have coached over a thousand boys and girls in these last ten years. The success rate is well over 70% in students appearing for entrance tests to nationally renowned medical and engineering colleges. "We also prepare students for the 12th standard school-leaving examinations," added Sanjay. More than 90% of such students have scored distinction. He plans to open another center next year.

Sanjay has 150 students drawn from top schools like St Francis Intermediate, City Montessori School, Jaipuria, Delhi Public School, Lucknow Public School, Loreto Convent, and even the renowned La Martiniere. "Quite a few are from the middle class. Some are from poor families. We don't charge them any fee." Furthermore, Sanjay and Singh maintain touch with their old students who are doing well in different professions. They inform him of changes taking place in the corporate and industrial world, likely scenarios in the future, and immediate requirements in terms of management skills. "Such regular inputs update the information we already have," said Sanjay. "We are then able to advise our present students about what they may encounter in the world outside."

He impresses upon his students two maxims: One, if the present is reasonably good, the future can be made better. Second, anyone can achieve almost anything by concentrating on the objective; other things automatically fall into place.

An upbeat opinion which fits in with India's growing economic clout, but a major societal factor continues to rattle Sanjay: Over-ambitious parents who pressurize their children to study subjects in which they have little interest.

"The student should be allowed to study what she likes. Only then will she experience an enormous enjoyment in learning. Only then will she successfully compete with others. Otherwise education becomes a daily torture. I have seen far too many doctor or engineer parents ordering their children to take up medicine or engineering when that is farthermost from the child's mind. It's tragic."

He pointed out that the Indian social structure still revolves around elders. They use money and status to make children obey their every dictate. Whenever the opportunity arises, Sanjay tries to advise such parents to loosen up, to let their children discover for themselves what they like best. "But very few listen. It's a mental block. They feel that as doctors, engineers, or chartered accountants, they have achieved a lot, so why listen to outsiders like me? They forget that education of the mind and the forming of a well-rounded personality is a continuous process. They mistake qualification for education. I see this more in people from northern India, this obstinacy and closed- mindedness. They refuse to imbibe the right attitudes to become what they should really be: the best support system for their children.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Coaching Classes:' Gateway to a Bright Career
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.