Mobile Payment Plans Move Ahead for B of A, Visa

By Johnson, Andrew | American Banker, January 12, 2011 | Go to article overview
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Mobile Payment Plans Move Ahead for B of A, Visa


Johnson, Andrew, American Banker


Byline: Andrew Johnson

As payments executives debate which approach to mobile payments will win out, Bank of America Corp. is showing greater commitment to a system based on Visa Inc.'s specifications.

B of A plans to expand a mobile payments trial it is conducting in New York to San Francisco and Atlanta this quarter, according to Michael Upton, the emerging channels capabilities executive at the Charlotte, N.C., company.

"We have liked what we learned," Upton said of the trial in an interview on Monday. "It does ... give us some of the market differentiation in terms of consumer adoption, behavior, preferences [and] perceptions by moving to some of the other markets."

Bank of America also plans to make the system commercially available to customers by the end of the year, Upton said.

The bank began a trial of the system with an unspecified number of employees in New York in September. The expanded pilot program will include employees as well as consumer customers, Upton said.

Bank of America is testing the system using a mobile wallet application that can store one of the bank's credit cards and one debit card.

Visa last month announced that its specifications to offer mobile payments services to bank customers on a commercial basis were available after 18 months of testing, with certain iPhone, BlackBerry and Android handset models certified for use.

"The technology is no longer under pilot restrictions," Dave Wentker, the head of mobile products at the San Francisco payments network, said in an interview Tuesday. "A bank may choose to run a limited test of it, but that's their own decision."

"They don't have to ask us for permission any longer, which is a great place to be for the market to be able to move forward," Wentker said.

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Mobile Payment Plans Move Ahead for B of A, Visa
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