Terrorism: What Is the State of Global Terrorism Today, Nearly a Decade after the Sept. 11 Attacks? Foreign Policy Asked the Top Terrorism Experts in the Field. Here's What They Told Us

Foreign Policy, January-February 2011 | Go to article overview

Terrorism: What Is the State of Global Terrorism Today, Nearly a Decade after the Sept. 11 Attacks? Foreign Policy Asked the Top Terrorism Experts in the Field. Here's What They Told Us


What one thing could the United States do to make itself safer immediately?

"No one thing will make us safer.-14% of the experts

Safety

Almost a decade after Sept. 11, 2001, is the United States more or less safe from the threat of terrorism?

(On a scale of 1 to 10; 1 square = 1 response)

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

The most dangerous terrorist in the world is

"someone we have not yet identified (which is part of what makes him dangerous)"

-Paul Pillar

"The terrorist whose actions precipitate a war between India and Pakistan."

-Andrew Exum

How likely is another terrorist attack in the United States or Europe in the next 12 months?

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

The world is devoting too much time and attention to the problem of terrorism.

True 51%

False 49%

Al Qaeda is stronger today than it was on 9/11

True 22%

False 78%

Where the threat is

Which country poses the greatest terrorist threat A
to the West today?

Pakistan                   79%
Yemen:                     12%
Iran:                       3%
Israel, Saudi Arabia:     1.5% each

Note: Table made from pie chart.

83% believe Osama bin Laden is in Pakistan.

Afghanistan: 3%

Only 20% think, it is necessary to win the war in Afghanistan. A quarter ask, "How are we defining win?"

87% believe it is possible to negotiate with the Taliban.

From which country are nuclear weapons or materials
most likely to land in the hands of terrorists?

Pakistan           57%
North Korea:       25%
Russia:            13%
Kazakhstan:         2%
Iran:               3%

Note: Table made from pie chart.

Why haven't there been any successful terrorist attacks in the United States since 9/11? 29% of the experts say: "Luck.

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