Team's Pioneering DNA Research Could Reveal How Cancer Begins

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), January 19, 2011 | Go to article overview

Team's Pioneering DNA Research Could Reveal How Cancer Begins


RESEARCH providing the first view of DNA damage throughout the entire human genome could offer a valuable new insight into how cancer begins.

The discovery, by scientists at Cardiff University's Department of Genetics, Haematology and Pathology, could have vital implications for cancer risk assessment, diagnostics and developing new treatments. The technique uses tiny microarrays to measure DNA damage frequency.

Thanks to the discovery, Professor Ray Waters, Dr Simon Reed and Dr Yumin Teng can examine all 28,000 human genes together. Previous techniques have only allowed scientists to analyse parts of about five human genes.

Professor Waters said: "DNA damage is the first trigger for cancer. This is really an exciting development and offers us the chance to examine DNA damage in the entire human genome.

"The approach is especially useful to examine the damage to people's DNA that can go on to cause cancer.

"We can also examine DNA damaging anti-cancer therapeutics and how responses in individual patients vary."

Using the technique, scientists may be able to discover whether people are predisposed to certain cancers due to their DNA.

Human DNA can be damaged through radiation, chemicals and events in the body itself.

Genetic defects inDNArepair can lead to cancer prone conditions, immunity defects, premature ageing and other problems. …

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Team's Pioneering DNA Research Could Reveal How Cancer Begins
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