Big Boy in Bondage

By Gener, Randy | American Theatre, January 2011 | Go to article overview

Big Boy in Bondage


Gener, Randy, American Theatre


MONTCLAIR, N.J.: In Prometheus Bound, Aeschylus' tragic version of the Greek legend, Prometheus is a Titan chained to a rock in the Caucasus Mountains. In the Belgian auteur and visual artist Jan Fabre's orgiastic new creation (co-authored with Jeroen Olyslaegers) Prometheus--Landscape II, the unapologetically chunky Lawrence Goldhuber can be spotted shackled to a huge rock, writhing, completely nude. Nothing on at all? I ask. "Perhaps a bit of underwear," Goldhuber replies from Antwerp, with a wicked laugh. "There are a lot of bondage scenes. I am very naked to the elements. The piece takes place on a bleak, post-apocalyptic landscape with a lot of sand. I mean, a lot of sand. I just finished washing the sand off my body."

Goldhuber is the sole American performer in Fabre's international 10-member ensemble Troubleyn. "Fabre was looking for a large man to work on a project about anorexia. That didn't work out. We worked on this instead. I'm three times the size of a normal actor; I'm sure that intrigued him. The roles got shuffled around; I'm not the main Prometheus anymore. A different plan was worked out through rehearsal. The original Greek text is a 45-page monologue. This is not a traditional narrative. It's text-driven with vignettes of movement, a constant array of visual stimuli. It's hard to define. Fabre works like a painter. As a disclaimer, I can't see the arc of the piece while I'm in the middle of creating it. …

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