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The Mail on Sunday (London, England), January 30, 2011 | Go to article overview

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wanda Jackson

The Party Ain't Over Nonesuch

***

There have been a fair few rock'n'roll resurrections down the years. Tina Turner and Aretha Franklin had their careers revitalised by admirers in the Eighties, Johnny Cash in the late Nineties and Neil Diamond in the Noughties. Now, Jack White reboots the reputation of Wanda Jackson. Jackson's name might not hold the power over the imagination as the others but tell that to Imelda May and those who consider her the first lady of rockabilly. Her choice of songs veers from the fairly obvious (Shakin' All Over and Rip It Up) to the surprising (Amy Winehouse's You Know I'm No Good and Dylan's Thunder In The Mountain). Throughout, 73-yearold Jackson is spirited in her efforts but it hasn't got the pathos of Cash, nor does it prompt a rethink of an artist, as w as the case with Diamond. A nice swansong, though.

Bob Geldof

How to Compose Popular Songs that will Sell

**

Bob might have pricked the conscience of a generation and saved the lives of countless Africans, but he still seeks acceptance as a musician and songwriter. The warm reception for his last album, Sex, Age & Death, in 2001 should have emboldened him, but 10 years is a long time to wait for a follow-up. There, his fine and at times harrowing meditation on his relationship with Paula Yates showed how effective he could be. …

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