A Band of Brothers; Meet the Real Guitar Heroes, War Veterans Making Music

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), January 30, 2011 | Go to article overview

A Band of Brothers; Meet the Real Guitar Heroes, War Veterans Making Music


Byline: Marc Horne

THEIR lives were changed for ever while they served their country, but now music is helping them on the road to recovery.

Soldiers who suffered serious injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq are being taught to play at the UK's first purpose-built military rehabilitation centre in Edinburgh. But instead of traditional military tunes, the soldiers are belting out power chords and heavy metal guitar riffs.

The pilot scheme has seen the Army's Personnel Recovery Centre (PRC) echo to the sound of hard rock anthems by AC/ DC, Guns 'N' Roses, Black Sabbath and Bon Jovi.

The 12-bed PRC, a joint venture between Help For Heroes, the Royal British Legion, the Ministry of Defence and Scots veterans' charity Erskine, has supported 60 servicemen and women since opening in 2009.

It lets residents and day visitors build up physical and mental strength so they can return to their regiment or civilian life.

The Help for Guitar Heroes Club has transformed the spirits of a number of the centre's residents.

Rifleman Dan Wildman is an enthusiastic member of the rock guitar class, despite having only limited use of one hand.

The 21-year-old suffered serious injuries after being shot in an apparent 'friendly fire' incident involving an US Apache helicopter while serving with the Edinburgh-based 3 Rifles in Afghanistan a year ago.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Band of Brothers; Meet the Real Guitar Heroes, War Veterans Making Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.