World & Nation in 60 Seconds the World the Nation

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 31, 2011 | Go to article overview

World & Nation in 60 Seconds the World the Nation


ElBaradei talks to protesters:

CAIRO -- Nobel Peace laureate Mohammed ElBaradei, Egypt's most prominent democracy advocate, took up a bullhorn Sunday to call for President Hosni Mubarak to go, speaking to thousands of protesters who defied a third night of curfew to mass in the capital's main square. This was the sixth day of protests.

South Sudan votes to secede:

JUBA, Sudan -- Southern Sudan's referendum commission said Sunday more than 99 percent of voters in the south opted to secede from the country's north in a vote held this month. The weeklong vote was held in early January and widely praised for being peaceful and for meeting international standards.

U.S. won't stop aid to Haiti:

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- The U.S. has no plans to halt aid to earthquake-ravaged Haiti despite a crisis over who will be the nation's next leader but does insist that Jude Celestin, the president's chosen successor, be dropped from the race, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Sunday.

Russian vessel freed from ice:

MOSCOW -- The Russian Transport Ministry says two icebreakers have freed a large fish-processing ship that had been trapped in ice off the country's far eastern coast since New Year's Eve. The Ministry said Sunday the ship has been towed to open water in the Sea of Okhotsk.

Fire at Venezuela arms depot:

MARACAY, Venezuela -- A fire and series of blasts tore through a military arms depot Sunday, killing one person and leading authorities to evacuate about 10,000 residents from areas stretching several miles from the site, said Rafael Isea, governor of Aragua state where Maracay is located.

Islamist leader back in Tunisia:

TUNIS, Tunisia -- Rachid Ghanouchi, the leader of a long-outlawed Tunisian Islamist party, returned home Sunday after two decades in exile, telling The Associated Press in his first interview on arrival that his views are moderate and that his Westward-looking country has nothing to fear.

German train crash kills 10:

BERLIN -- German authorities said Sunday the death toll could still rise from a head-on collision between a cargo train and a passenger train that killed at least 10 people, injured 23 others and left wreckage scattered across a frost-covered field. The trains crashed in heavy fog late Saturday on a single-line track close to Saxony-Anhalt's state capital Magdeburg.

Albanian police arrest 3:

TIRANA, Albania -- Police said Sunday they detained three people suspected of conspiring to murder Socialist Party leader Edi Rama, a top opposition leader, at an anti-government protest, as the opposition said it would not back down from its campaign against the ruling party for alleged corruption.

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